City Government Program

New York, New York: CloudBurst Study, South Jamaica Houses

City: New York
Country / US State / US Territory: New York
Type of Solution: City Government Program
Climate Impact: Hurricanes and Storm Surge; Extreme Precipitation and Flooding
Social Value Created: Food security and nutrition; community cohesion, bikeability; livability; urban beautification

The Cloudburst Study was conducted by NYC through a collaborative project with Copenhagen to prevent flooding during heavy precipitation events, aka. Cloudbursts. NYC and Copenhagen are both facing rising sea levels and Cloudbursts, so the cities have partnered to develop new innovative projects to enhance stormwater management. Their solutions are aimed at creating inspiring urban areas and other co-benefits for citizens, local businesses, and the city.

South Jamaica Houses redevelopment is one pilot project that has emerged from the NYC Cloudburst Study. The project will increase liveability of the area, and will result in additional shared green space for recreation, bike paths, and urban gardening. Improved public spaces will help to improve community cohesion. Additionally, the college will be better integrated into the surrounding community, also contributing to social cohesion.

Fig: Rendering of South Jamaica Houses project on a dry day (Image retrieved from http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/pdf/climate/nyc-cloudburst-study.pdf)


Fig: Rendering of South Jamaica Houses project on a wet day (Image retrieved from http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/pdf/climate/nyc-cloudburst-study.pdf)

Fig: Map showing the environmental benefits (blue) and social benefits (orange) that will result from the project

Sources

C40 Cities. (September 14, 2017). Cities100: New York City and Copenhagen – cities collaborating on climate resilience. Retrieved from https://www.c40.org/case_studies/cities100-new-york-city-and-copenhagen-cities-collaborating-on-climate-resilience.

New York City Department of Environmental Protection. (January, 2017). Cloudburst resiliency planning study: executive summary. Retrieved from http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/pdf/climate/nyc-cloudburst-study.pdf.

New York, New York: Build it Back Program

City: New York
Country / US State / US Territory: New York
Type of Solution: City Government Program
Climate Impact: Seal Level Rise; Hurricanes and Storm Surge; Extreme Precipitation and Flooding
Social Value Created: Affordable and Safe Housing; Social Justice and Equity for Vulnerable Communities; Public Health and Safety

The Built It Back Program was started after Hurricane Sandy struck in 2012. The Program provided homeowners, landlords, and tenants in low- and middle-income neighborhoods affected by the storm with funds sustainably rebuild homes. The goal of the program is to help vulnerable communities rebuild their homes and be better prepared for future hurricanes.

Homes must be rebuilt above Base Flood Elevation level and must be certified by Enterprise Green Communities, a certification for sustainable and energy efficient buildings, to improve communities’ resilience to flooding and Sea Level Rise. In addition to assistance in reconstructing homes, the Program funded legal counseling and temporary housing for residents affected.

The Program received 20,000 applications, and 16,000 completed the initial eligibility review. As of June 2018, the program has helped 12,500 households through reimbursement checks, construction starts, and acquisitions

Fig: A house that has been rebuilt as part of the Build It Back Program, showcasing the elevated design (Photo retrieved from https://twitter.com/NYCBuilditBack)

Fig: A house on Staten Island that has been rebuilt as part of the Build It Back Program (Photo retrieved from https://twitter.com/NYCBuilditBack)

Sources

The City of New York. (2018). NYC Build It Back Stronger and Safer: Welcome to NYC Housing Recovery. Retrieved from http://www.nyc.gov/html/recovery/html/home/home.shtml.

The Adaptation Clearinghouse. (2016). New York City Build It Back Program. Retrieved from http://www.adaptationclearinghouse.org/resources/new-york-city-build-it-back-program.html.