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Neal Woodbury

Neal Woodbury

Director and Professor, School of Molecular Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

nwoodbury@asu.edu

480-965-3294

School of Molecular Sciences
Arizona State University
PO Box 871604
Tempe, AZ 85287-1604

Titles

  • Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability
  • Director and Professor, School of Molecular Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Chief Scientific Officer, BioDesign Institute

Biography

Professor Neal Woodbury received his BS degree from the University of California-Davis and his PhD degree from the University of Washington-Seattle in 1986. He then performed postdoctoral research at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, and later at Stanford University. He joined the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department at Arizona State University (now School of Molecular Sciences) in 1988. His research is performed in the Center for Innovations in Medicine in the Biodesign Institute. One aspect of his research has focused on the development of very large ordered libraries of peptides on surfaces using photolithographic approaches. Working closely with Professor Stephen Johnston, he has applied these synthetic approaches to support a diagnostic platform that Johnston invented called immunosignaturing, a powerful approach to comprehensive health monitoring by frequent profiling of the circulating antibody repertoire. Johnston and Woodbury founded HealthTell, LLC to commercialize this opportunity. Another aspect of Woodburys work involves the study of photosynthetic systems, with the goal of understanding the role that protein dynamics plays in protein-mediated chemistry. He works with Dr. Su Lin and Professors Dmitry Matyushov and James Allen in this area. This has resulted in a convergence of experimental and theoretical information that supports the notion the proteins have the unique ability as chemical solvents to control the detailed dynamics of the bath surrounding a reaction and Nature has used this to great advantage. Finally, Woodbury works in collaboration with Professors Hao Yan and Don Seo to translate some of the ideas that have come out of the study of photosynthesis and enzymology to create nanoscale devices based on DNA nanostructures and nanophotonic systems. This work has made it clear that mimicking biologys ability to organize catalysis at the nanoscale is a very powerful approach to directing both chemical and photochemical reactions in specific ways.

Education

  • PhD, University of Washington, 1986
  • BS, University of California-Davis

Expertise

External Links

Journal Articles

2007

Gibasiewicz, K., V. M. Ramesh, S. Lin, K. Redding, N. W. Woodbury and A. N. Webber. 2007. Two equilibration pools of chlorophylls in the Photosystem I core antenna of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Photosynthesis Research 92:55-63. DOI: 10.1007/s11120-006-9125-1. (link )

2003

Gibasiewicz, K., V. M. Ramesh, S. Lin, K. Redding, N. W. Woodbury and A. N. Webber. 2003. Excitonic interactions in wild-type and mutant PSI reaction centers. Biophysical Journal 85(4):2547-2559. DOI: 10.1016/S0006-3495(03)74677-3. (link )

2002

Gibasiewicz, K., V. M. Ramesh, S. Lin, N. W. Woodbury and A. N. Webber. 2002. Excitation dynamics in eukaryotic PSI from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC 2692 at 10 K. Direct detection of the reaction center exciton states. Journal of Physical Chemistry B 106(24):6322-6330. DOI: 10.1021/jp014608l. (link )

2001

Gibasiewicz, K., V. M. Ramesh, A. N. Melkozernov, S. Lin, N. W. Woodbury, R. E. Blankenship and A. N. Webber. 2001. Excitation dynamics in the core antenna of PS I from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC 2696 at room temperature. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 105(45):11,498-11,506. DOI: 10.1021/jp012089g. (link )

Presentations

2011

Lim, M., M. Bivona, A. M. Koster, E. Spiro, C. Jaeger, N. W. Woodbury and R. Poe. 2011. Sustainability of what, how and for whom? Progress development, and justice in greater Phoenix. Roundtable discussion at American Society for Environmental History Conference, Phoenix.

Conference Papers

2001

Gibasiewicz, K., V. M. Ramesh, S. Lin, K. Redding, N. W. Woodbury and A. N. Webber. 2001. Mutation of ligands to connecting chlorophylls perturbs excitation dynamics in the core antenna of PS I from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Photosynthesis. 12th International Congress on Photosynthesis. (link )