Skip to Content
David Chandler

David Chandler

Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University

dgchandl@syr.edu

315-443-8706

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeirng
Syracuse University

Titles

  • Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University

Biography

Dr. Chandler's research investigates hydrologic change related to anthropogenic ecologic and climatic drivers. The primary lenses through which he views change are alteration of flow paths, water balance or infiltration capacity. To address these concerns, he has engaged in research projects targeted to guide land management in a wide range of geomorphologic and climatic settings.

Deforestation and rangeland succession: Wildland hydrology is governed primarily by subsurface flowpaths and plant water relations. Changes in land cover or climate often alter either of these controls in a manner that drives a complex response. My research focuses on the evolution of system properties for a given land cover and the consequences of abrupt alteration.

Climate change: Climate change is an important driver for terrestrial hydrology, yet most contemporary climate models operate at length and time scales much greater than those governing hydrologic processes. His students reconcile this problem by developing empirical relationships from long-term data sets to predict the likely effects of continued climate change on regional hydrology.

Urban storm water: Approximately seven hundred cities in the USA require new infrastructure to replace the outdated combined sanitary sewer and storm drain systems. Many are interested in replacing or supplementing these systems with green infrastructure.He is currently developing the capacity to understand the hydrologic performance, ecosystem interactions and functional limitations of the varied and widespread green infrastructure projects currently under construction in Syracuse and other cities in the Northeast USA.

Education

  • PhD, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Cornell University, 1998
  • MS, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Cornell University, 1995
  • BA, Chemistry, University of Vermont, 1984

Expertise

Journal Articles

2017

Eger, C., D. G. Chandler and C. T. Driscoll. 2017. Hydrologic processes that govern stormwater infrastructure behaviour. Hydrological Processes 31(25):4492-4506. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.11353. (link )

Roodsari, B. K. and D. G. Chandler. 2017. Distribution of surface imperviousness in small urban catchments predicts runoff peak flows and stream flashiness. Hydrological Processes 31(17):2990-3002. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.11230. (link )

Posters

2018

Shafiei Shiva, J. and D. G. Chandler. 2018. Rising heatwave trends: A case study in ten communities across the USA. Poster presented at the College of Engineering and Computer Science Research Day, March 30-, 2018, Syracuse Sheraton Hotel, Syracuse, NY. (link )

Presentations

2018

Shafiei Shiva, J. and D. G. Chandler. 2018. High resolution identification of local vulnerabilities to urban heatwaves. Presentation at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2018, April 8-13, 2018, Vienna, Austria. (link )

Shafiei Shiva, J. and D. G. Chandler. 2018. Rising heatwave trends: a case study in ten communities across the USA. Presentation at the Engineering and Computer Science Research Day, March 30, 2018, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.

2017

Driscoll, C. T., D. G. Chandler and C. Eger. 2017. Variability in the function of green infrastructure technologies: Lessons from science and practice. Presentation at the Annul Meeting Portland ESA Meeting 2017, August 6-11, 2017, Portland, OR. (link )

2016

Roodsari, B. K. and D. G. Chandler. 2016. RNICO: A new simple geometric index for assessing the impact of urban development pattern on peak flows in urban catchments. Presentation at the AGU 2016 Fall Meeting, December 12-16, 2016, San Francisco, CA. (link )

Shafiei, S. J. and D. G. Chandler. 2016. Improving the generalized watershed loading function (GWLF) model in the urban area by considering the urban water infrastructures: A case study in Onondaga Lake watershed. Presentation at the 3rd New England Graduate Student Water Symposium, Amherst, MA.

2015

Chester, M., N. B. Grimm, C. L. Redman, T. R. Miller, P. T. McPhearson, T. A. Munoz-Erickson and D. G. Chandler. 2015. Developing a concept of social-ecological-technological systems to characterize resilience of urban areas and infrastructure to extreme events. Presentation at the AGU Fall Meeting 2015, 14-18 December 2015, San Francisco, California. (link )