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Future and systems thinking is understanding how things influence each other as part of an entire system. ASU researchers are examining future and systems thinking topics like how ecosystems work based on their makeup or how the decisions we make now will influence our lives in the future.

Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research

Through interdisciplinary projects integrating natural sciences, social science, and engineering, the Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research project examines the effects of urbanization on a desert ecosystem and vice versa.

Dan Childers Becky Ball Heather Bateman Christopher Boone Stevan Earl Nancy Grimm Sharon Harlan Charles Redman Philip Tarrant Billie Turner II Sally Wittlinger

Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes

The Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes is an intellectual network aimed at enhancing the contribution of science and technology to society's pursuit of equality, justice, freedom, and overall quality of life. The Consortium creates knowledge and methods, cultivates public discourse, and fosters policies to help decision makers and institutions grapple with the immense power and importance of science and technology as society charts a course for the future.

David Guston Daniel Sarewitz

Cyber-Knowledge Infrastructure for Geospatial Data

This CAREER award will support a promising early-career investigator's efforts to build key theories and techniques of a cyber-knowledge infrastructure that enhances access, search, and reasoning capabilities for using geospatial data across the ever-expanding Web.

Wenwen Li

Decision Center for a Desert City

The Decision Center for a Desert City conducts climate, water, and decision research and develops innovative tools to bridge the boundary between scientists and decision makers and put their work into the hands of those whose concern is for the sustainable future of Greater Phoenix.

Dave White Kelli Larson Michael Hanemann Enrique Vivoni Amber Wutich

Defining Stream Biomes to Better Understand and Forecast Stream Ecosystem Change

This research will develop a biome classification system for streams to better understand how streams function and provide an ability to predict how streams will change from human and environmental factors.

Nancy Grimm

EASM-3: Collaborative Research: Physics-based Predictive Modeling for Integrated Agricultural and Urban Applications

A collaborative and interdisciplinary team from Arizona State University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research jointly develops integrated agricultural and urban models necessary to examine hydroclimatic impacts and economic and social benefits/tradeoffs associated with agricultural and urban land use/cover changes accompanying localization of food production within cities.

Alex Mahalov

Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering

The Metis Center seeks to provide the basis for understanding, designing, and managing the complex integrated built/human/natural systems that increasingly characterize our planet in the Anthropocene – the Age of Humans. To this end, we combine research, teaching, outreach and public service in an effort to learn how engineered and built systems are integrated with natural and human systems.

Braden Allenby Mikhail Chester Mounir El Asmar Margaret Garcia Nathan Johnson Giuseppe Mascaro Thad Miller

Phoenix Area Social Survey

This survey studies the relationships between people and the natural environment in the Phoenix metro area.

Sharon Harlan Nancy Grimm Christopher Boone Amber Wutich Darren Ruddell Rimjhim Aggarwal Dan Childers Stevan Earl Kelli Larson Kerry Smith Paige Warren

The Measurement of Scale and Process Heterogeneity Through Local Multivariate Models

This project will address several fundamental issues in the statistical analysis of local processes through three types of multi-scale models that recently have been developed. Such research is important because all data collected in both biophysical and social environments results from a variety of processes, and a fundamental characteristic of many processes is the geographic scale at which they occur.

Stewart Fotheringham

Urban Resilience to Extreme Weather Related Events

Urban areas are vulnerable to extreme weather related events given their location, high concentration of people, and increasingly complex and interdependent infrastructure. Impacts of Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, and other disasters demonstrate not just failures in built infrastructure, they highlight the inadequacy of institutions, resources, and information systems to prepare for and respond to events of this magnitude. The Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN) will develop a novel theoretical framework for integrating social, ecological, and technological system (SETS) dimensions for conceptualizing, analyzing, and supporting urban infrastructure decisions in the face of climatic uncertainty in a more holistic way.

Charles Redman Mikhail Chester Nancy Grimm Peter Groffman David Iwaniec Timon McPhearson Thad Miller Tischa Munoz-Erickson

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