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Use-inspired research  with purpose and impact


Use-inspired research
 with purpose and impact


Use-inspired research
 with purpose and impact

Humans have long affected the landscapes in which they live, sometimes with disastrous consequences. ASU researchers are currently studying past and present impacts of humanity to develop sustainable strategies for the future. While some multidisciplinary teams are examining past societies to understand key lessons about the nature and possible outcomes of interactions among human and natural systems, others teams are pioneering the new field of urban ecology to understand modern human effects on biodiversity and habitat.

Adolescent and Adult Outcomes of Early Life Lactroncrine Programming of Temperament: Neuroenergetics and Social Behavior

This project will investigate how mother's milk ingested in infancy influences neurobiology and social behavior in adolescence and adulthood by programming behavior during early life.

Katie Hinde

Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy

The Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy (B-CIVV) is focused on exploiting cutting edge advances in microbiology and immunology, as well as the design and use of novel therapeutics based on vaccinology, virotherapy and immunotherapy to combat infectious diseases and cancer. These include development of biological therapeutics that enhance immune responses to pathogens and tumors. The Center is devising new and effective ways of producing advanced vaccines, virotherapies and immunotherapeutics for this purpose.

Biodesign Institute

The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University spurs scientific breakthroughs that improve health, protect lives and sustain our planet. Our research is aimed at predicting, preventing and detecting the onset of disease, developing renewable energy and reducing environmental damage and developing innovations that safeguard our nation and the world.

Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Center for

The primary aim of the Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors is to create powerful, sensitive, and selective sensors - ranging from embedded systems to handheld devices - that can detect the presence of specific chemicals in the environment, or biomarkers in the body. The Center's research can be divided up into several key themes. Some of the technologies are focused on the detection of harmful chemicals that are a threat to the environment and human health. Others look inside the body for markers or presence of disease. Still others focus on the detection of human-made threats.

Bioenergy and Photosynthesis, Center for

The center carries out frontier multidisciplinary scientific research designed to use biological and biologically-based artificial systems to address societal energy needs in a sustainable manner, with an emphasis on solar energy conversion and bioinspired energy transformation to meet human needs, and investigates other aspects of photosynthesis that affect society and the environment.

Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research

Through interdisciplinary projects integrating natural sciences, social science, and engineering, the Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research project examines the effects of urbanization on a desert ecosystem and vice versa.

Becky Ball Heather Bateman Christopher Boone Dan Childers Stevan Earl Sharon Harlan Charles Redman Philip Tarrant Billie Turner II Sally Wittlinger

Defining Stream Biomes to Better Understand and Forecast Stream Ecosystem Change

This research will develop a biome classification system for streams to better understand how streams function and provide an ability to predict how streams will change from human and environmental factors.

Nancy Grimm

Dimensions US-China: Collaborative Research: Phylogenetic, Functional, and Genetic Diversity and Ecosystem Functions in a Fragmented Landscape

This project - jointly funded with the Chinese National Science Foundation (NSFC) - will study the relationships among ecological/evolutionary measures of biodiversity, and ecosystem functions. In particular, the investigators will investigate the hypothesis that succession drives changes in biodiversity, which in turn causes altered ecosystem function.

Jianguo Wu

Drought-Net: A Global Network to Assess Terrestrial Ecosystem Sensitivity to Drought

The Drought-Net Research Coordination Network was established to advance understanding of the determinants of terrestrial ecosystem responses to drought by bringing together an international group of scientists to conduct three complementary research coordination activities: 1) planning and coordinating new research using standardized measurements to leverage the value of existing drought experiments across the globe, 2) finalizing the design and facilitating the establishment of a new international network of coordinated drought experiments, and 3) training highly motivated graduate students to conduct synthetic and network-level research through Distributed Graduate Seminars focused on drought.

Richard Phillips Osvaldo Sala Melinda Smith

Ecosystem Response to N and Organic C Deposition from the Urban Atmosphere

The "Urban Air" project studies the exchange of chemical elements between land and atmosphere in urban systems.

Sharon Hall Stevan Earl Nancy Grimm Quincy Stewart

Effects of Flow Regime Shifts, Anticedent Hydrology, Nitrogen Pulses and Resource Quanitity and Quality on Food Chain Length in Rivers

The study will provide fundamental information on how the timing of floods and droughts across years influences water quality (nitrate inputs to rivers), primary production, and the production of animals higher in the food web, such as fish. The researchers will produce a synthesis of research in hydrology and ecology to improve the management of arid land rivers.

John Sabo

Environmental Biotechnology, Swette Center for

The Center for Environmental Biotechnology focuses on developing microbiological systems that capture or develop renewable resources and also prevent or clean up environmental pollution. Center researchers combine engineering with microbiology, molecular biology, and chemistry in order to gain an integrated understanding of how microbial ecosystems work and can be controlled to reclaim polluted water, generate energy from waste substances, and improve public health and sustainability.

Laboratory for Algae Research and Biotechnology

The Laboratory for Algae Research and Biotechnology adds to the body of basic research on algae and cyanobacteria, while also conducting applied research into renewable energy production, environmental remediation, and human nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

Milton Sommerfeld

Linking Livestock Markets and Grazing Practices with the Nutritional Ecology of Grasses and Locusts Under Alternative Property Rights Regimes

Research has recently shown that overgrazing of livestock in a grassland in China lowered the nitrogen content of the grasses and that this caused a rise in the abundance of a locust likely to lead to locust swarms. This research will test whether this is also true for related species of locust in Australia and western Africa, and link both grazing practices and locust swarms to economics and social policy in the three contrasting regions.

Arianne Cease James Elser Eli Fenichel Joleen Hadrich Jon Harrison

Multiscale Effects of Climate Variability and Change on Hydrologic Regimes, Ecosystem Function, and Community Structure in a Desert Stream and Its Catchment

This project focuses on using new statistical techniques that describe hydrological regimes, coupled with long-term measurements of stream structure and processes, to understand how shifts in climate and river discharge regimes on many time scales will influence the ecosystem.

Nancy Grimm John Sabo

Phoenix Area Social Survey

This survey studies the relationships between people and the natural environment in the Phoenix metro area.

Sharon Harlan Christopher Boone Amber Wutich Darren Ruddell Rimjhim Aggarwal Dan Childers Stevan Earl Kelli Larson Kerry Smith Paige Warren

Reassessing the Biological Functions of the Plant Type I H+-PPase

Specifying how sugar moves to various tissues within the plant will allow scientists to develop strategies to optimize sugar translocation in crops that increase yield while reducing the environmental impacts of production agriculture.

Roberto Gaxiola Kendal Hirschi

Simon A. Levin Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center

The Simon A. Levin Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center vision includes: bridging the gap between the biological, environmental, and social sciences and the mathematical sciences; promotion and support of cross-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary research that relies on state of the art computational, modeling and quantitative approaches; and the training of a new generation of computational mathematical, and theoretical scientists whose research is driven by the application of computational, mathematical, modeling and simulation approaches to the solution of problems that will improve the human condition.

Carlos Castillo-Chavez

Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance

The Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance is North America’s central forum for convening industry, government, civil society, and academia to advocate for the sustainable use, recovery, and recycling of phosphorus in the food system.

Water availability controls on above-belowground productivity: Herbivory versus plant response

This study addresses the questions: How does precipitation affect the above/belowground partitioning of carbon? During drought periods, are above and belowground structures equally affected, or are roots affected less than leaves and branches? Finally, is the effect of precipitation on carbon allocation constant or does it vary from deserts to humid grasslands?

Osvaldo Sala

Total: 20