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Ariel Anbar

Ariel Anbar
Distinguished Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability
Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Professor, School of Molecular Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Affiliated Faculty, Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability

anbar@asu.edu
480-965-0767
Website

School of Earth and Space Exploration
Arizona State University
PO Box 871404
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404

Dr. Anbar is a biogeochemist interested in the past and future evolution of the Earth as a habitable planet and how knowledge of that evolution informs the search for inhabited worlds beyond Earth. His current research focuses on the chemical evolution of the environment, especially changes in ocean oxygenation through time, and its consequences for life. Dr. Anbar works to develop and apply new analytical methods in elemental and isotope geochemistry to tease information about ancient environments from the geologic record. This research involves chemical and biochemical experiments, quantum chemical modeling, and geological field work. Dr. Anbar has also studied the atmospheric chemistry of present-day Earth and Mars, the bombardment history of the early Earth, and the use of metal stable isotopes in biomedicine. He teaches courses in environmental chemistry and isotope biogeochemistry.

PhD, Geochemistry, California Institute of Technology, 1996

MS, Geochemistry, California Institute of Technology, 1991

AB, Geological Sciences and Chemistry, Harvard College, 1989

Journal Articles

2011

Brennecka, G. A., A. D. Hermann, T. J. Algeo and A. D. Anbar. 2011. Rapid expansion of oceanic anoxia immediately before the end-Permian extinction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) 1-4. DOI: doi/10.1073/pnas.1106039108. (link )

Brennecka, G., L. E. Wasylenki, S. Weyer and A. D. Anbar. 2011. Uranium isotope fractionation during adsorption to Mn-oxyhydroxides. Env. Sci. Tech. 45:1370-1375. DOI: 10.1021/es03061v. (link )

Wasylenki, L. E., C. L. Weeks, J. R. Bargar, T. G. Spiro, J. R. Hein and A. D. Anbar. 2011. The molecular mechanism of Mo isotope fractionation during adsorption to birnessite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75:5019-5031.

2010

Glass, J. B., F. Wolfe-Simon, J. J. Elser and A. D. Anbar. 2010. Molybdenum–nitrogen co-limitation in freshwater and coastal heterocystous cyanobacteria. Limnology and Oceanography 55(2):667-676. DOI: 10.4319/lo.2010.55.2.0667. (link )

2009

Glass, J. B., F. Wolfe-Simon and A. D. Anbar. 2009. Coevolution of marine metal availability and photoautotrophic nitrogen assimilation. Sci. Total Env. 407:5104-4109.

Majestic, B. J., A. D. Anbar and P. Herckes. 2009. Measuring natural variatons of iron isotopic composition in atmospheric aerosols for use in source-apportionment studies. Env. Sci. Tech. 43:4327-4333.

2008

Anbar, A. D. 2008. Elements and evolution. Science 322:1481-1483.

Posters

2010

Mead, C., A. D. Anbar, J. R. Lyons and T. M. Johnson. 2010. Mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes in compact fluorescent light bulbs. Poster presented December 13-17 at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, CA.

Presentations

2011

Mead, C., S. Semken and A. D. Anbar. 2011. Identifying misconceptions about biogeochemistry among undergraduates. Presentation October 9-12 at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America, Minneapolis, MN.

2010

Mead, C., A. D. Anbar and P. Johnson. 2010. Mass-Independent fractionation of Hg isotopes resulting from photochemical self-shielding. Presentation at the June 13-18 Goldschmidt Conference, Knoxville, TX.