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Sustainability News

Green: What Drives Cities’ Runaway Growth?

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

August 22, 2011

From The New York Times, this post from Felicity Barringer highlights a study co-authored by Michail Fragkias, Executive Officer of the UGEC Project at ASU's Global Institute of Sustainability.

Urban areas are growing even faster than urban populations are, and by 2030 urbanized land around the globe will expand by 590,000 square miles — an amount almost equal to the land mass of Mongolia, according to a new study.

The study, which was just published in the journal PLoS One, analyzed 326 other studies that used remote-sensing images to track changes in land use. The authors were Karen C. Seto of Yale’s School of Forestry and Environment Studies; Michail Fragkias of Arizona State University’s Global Institute for Sustainability; Michael K. Reilly of Stanford’s Department of Environmental Earth System Science; and Burak Güneralp of Texas A&M.

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The Sustainability Consortium Opens European Office, Appoints Three New Board Members Including Two NGOs

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

August 16, 2011

Actions underscore consortium’s strategic plan to deliver a sustainability measurement and reporting system and become a global organization

TEMPE, Ariz., – Aug. 16, 2011 - The Sustainability Consortium (TSC) today announced the opening of its European office and theexpansion of its board of directors to include Non-Government Organization (NGO) members. Both moves strongly align with TSC’s focus of growth, incorporating global partners, and delivering on its mission to design and implement science-based measurement and reporting systems that are accessible to manufacturers and consumers.

TSC’s European office will operate in partnership with Wageningen University in the Netherlands. Wageningen UR (WUR) is the leading agricultural university in Europe with a strong commitment to sustainability. WUR has strong relationships with agricultural producers, food processors, and retailers in Europe, includingmany TSC members. In addition, Aalt Dijkhuizen, president and CEO at Wageningen UR, is the third Academic Director appointed to TSC's board.

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Changes in Maryvale, Real and Perceived

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

August 12, 2011

From KJZZ 91.5 FM, Phoenix, this report from Steve Goldstein features ASU Senior Sustainability Scientist Aaron Golub. Golub's research relates to urban planning and public transportation.

Maryvale was once a highly desirable area to buy a family home. But changes in the area's demographics – and changes in perception through the years – have altered the way many people look at Maryvale. We find out what community members think about the place they call home, and what they want from the city of Phoenix government. Steve Goldstein has this report.

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The Value Proposition of a Sustainable Degree

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

August 12, 2011

From Sustainability: The Journal of Record, June 2011, 4(3): 113-116, an article by Ted Mero about ASU School of Sustainability graduate Bavousett and how a degree in sustainability from ASU fits in with companies’ needs today.

Brigitte Bavousett is the first-ever student to graduate with a degree in sustainability. Surely in a world moving toward a more sustainable future, the first accredited graduate in the field could take the professional realm by storm, picking and choosing from the endless suitors knocking down her door. As sustainability programs continue to develop and expand throughout the country’s colleges and universities, those who enter the field must build a knowledge-base and skill set that is not only practical, but marketable, as they look to overcome the instinct of business to tackle its sustainability goals and challenges with in-house employees.

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What Is the Worth of a Degree in Sustainability?

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

August 12, 2011

An editorial by George Basile, Senior Sustainability Scientist and Associate Professor in the School of Sustainability, was featured in Sustainability: The Journal of Record, June 2011, 4(3): 95-97.

From climate change to global inequity, sustainability is often described as a cacophony of seemingly disparate and globally grand challenges to which the expectation of a tantalizingly simple solution is then attached, i.e., “Please do today, so that we can still do tomorrow.” With this rather heroic framing, what does an academic degree in sustainability mean? What is its role and value-proposition for those students who are the brave pioneers in this emerging field?

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ASU Faculty Help Tip the Scales Toward Global Sustainability at Nobel Symposium

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

June 27, 2011

sander
Sander van der Leeuw

Elinor_Ostrom
Elinor Ostrom

ASU’s Sander van der Leeuw and Elinor Ostrom joined Nobel Laureates, policymakers, and leading sustainability experts at the Third Nobel Laureate Symposium on Sustainability held at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm May 16-19, 2011. The symposium was hosted and supported by HM King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.

The four-day meeting culminated in the Stockholm Memorandum: “Tipping the Scales Toward Sustainability.” This document was signed by key Nobel Laureates and handed over to the High-level Panel on Global Sustainability appointed by the UN Secretary General. Conclusions from the UN Panel will feed into the preparations for the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro and into ongoing climate negotiations.

The Stockholm Memorandum noted that humans are now the most significant driver of global change and are transgressing important planetary boundaries that have kept civilization safe for the past 10,000 years. It called for coherent global action to reverse negative environmental trends and redress inequalities while also creating long-term structural solutions that gradually change values, institutions, and policy frameworks.

Among the top priorities cited by the memorandum were changing people’s mindset into a sustainability-oriented one, reaching a more equitable world, managing the climate-energy challenge, creating an efficiency revolution, ensuring affordable food for all, moving beyond green growth, reducing human pressures, strengthening Earth System Governance, and enacting a new contract between science and society.

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High School Students Win Big and Gain Real World Experience through ASU Research Program

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

June 24, 2011

ASU’s Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment Expands with New Partnership

TEMPE, Ariz., -- Since 1998, nearly 200 high school students from across the Phoenix metro area have done cutting-edge scientific research in labs at Arizona State University (ASU). This opportunity for advanced study has been made possible by the Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (SCENE), a nonprofit organization that partners with the ASU Global Institute of Sustainability to offer a program called Research Experiences for High School Students. SCENE is headed by Executive Administrator, Kathryn Kyle.

Now, to strengthen and expand the program, SCENE and the Global Institute of Sustainability are forming a new partnership with the LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

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Great Job Growth in Sustainability, But… Only If You Also Have Other Skills

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

June 16, 2011

TEMPE, Ariz. (June 15, 2011) — Many people think the next big job boom will happen in the area of sustainability. Research from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University shows a huge percentage of employers are already giving positive weight to job candidates with sustainability skills. However, the same research indicates these job applicants also need professional training in existing fields, to push them over the top in the hiring process.

“Right now, sustainability jobs in business are linked to existing organizational structures,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Professor Kevin Dooley, who authored the research. “You’re probably not going to find a sustainability department in many companies, but employees with skills and interest in sustainability will get assigned to related projects and move up the ladder. Job candidates with both sustainability skills and a solid professional background in a field like business or engineering are receiving job offers that far exceed what’s warranted in the current market, and that’s because there aren’t many of them.”

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Marketplace & The Gary Comer Global Agenda Present: Moving By Degrees The Future Energy Abyss, An Intimate Conversation with John Hofmeister

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

June 15, 2011

Retired Shell Oil President Shares Thoughts; ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Hosts Event

(ST. PAUL, Minn.) June 15, 2011– American Public Media’s Marketplace™ and The Gary Comer Global Agenda, in partnership with Arizona State University’s Global Institute of Sustainability, will present Moving By Degrees – The Future Energy Abyss, Thursday, June 16 at 5:30 p.m. at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, First Amendment Forum Room, Downtown Campus.

The program will be an intimate conversation between David Brancaccio, senior correspondent, Marketplace’s Economy 4.0 and retired Shell Oil President John Hofmeister, one of the world’s foremost experts on energy and climate. They will discuss everything from climate change and energy independence to global energy leadership and the unrest currently remaking the Middle East.

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ASU Professor Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

May 10, 2011

TEMPE, Ariz., -- Michael Hanemann, a world-renowned environmental economist, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Hanemann is the Julie A. Wrigley Chair in Sustainability at Arizona State University (ASU), where he holds joint appointments in the Department of Economics of the W. P. Carey School of Business, and in the School of Sustainability.

Hanemann is working on the future water needs of the Hopi Tribe under the new Arizona standard for Indian water rights, which calls for a supply of water adequate to make the Reservation a “comfortable homeland” and to permit sustained economic growth. He also is assisting the U.S. Geological Survey as it moves forward to implement an adaptive management strategy for the Glen Canyon Dam.

A leading expert hired by the California Energy Commission, the California State Assembly, and local governments in the San Francisco Bay Area, Hanemann is recognized globally for his research in non-market valuation and his work on the economics of water and the economics of irreversibility and adaptive management.  His recent work includes assessing the vulnerability of Bay Area communities to climate change and developing appropriate adaptation strategies – focused particularly on water, transportation, coastal impacts, agriculture, and health.

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Spring 2011 Convocation speaker shares her sustainability story

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

May 10, 2011

During her nine years in the United States, ASU student Cinthia Carvajal of Bolivia has had to learn a new language and adapt to new cultural and social norms. But she has excelled, and is receiving a double bachelor’s degree in sustainability and anthropology.

Carvajal will be giving back to her community by going out to middle school classrooms and promoting research, math and science. During the summer Carvajal also will conduct research on squatter settlements in Bolivia where she plans to apply her anthropological and sustainability knowledge to help develop more sustainable neighborhoods.

She talks about her experience at ASU.

Is $2.50 per gallon of gasoline a thing of the past?

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

May 8, 2011

PHOENIX - Each Sunday, ABC15.com debuts an Arizona issue - along with two opposing sides on the topic. Don’t worry, you always have the opportunity to make comments at the bottom of the page. Yeah, your opinion matters, too.

This week we're tackling the debate on whether or not $2.50 per gallon of gasoline is a thing of the past.

John Hofmeister, a distinguished sustainability scholar and retired president of Shell Oil Company, says with the U.S. producing less, but expecting to consume the same, consumers here will face gasoline prices in the $5 to $6 and the price will climb even higher.

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President's awards honor university innovators

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

May 4, 2011

From creating a program to capture and re-use water to make the university more sustainable, to developing an online tutoring program to increase student success, to initiating and delivering an innovation and entrepreneurship program for tribal communities, ASU employees are helping their university and community in a big way.

In recognition of their efforts and achievement, ASU President Michael Crow hosted a reception to present the President’s Award for Innovation, the President’s Award for Sustainability, the President’s Medal for Social Embeddedness, and the Top Multiple Sun Award for Individual Excellence.

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Getting dirty to clean up ASU's organic waste

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

April 28, 2011

It’s a dirty job, and ASU students rallied to do it.

Rolling up their sleeves and getting down and grimy with a full day’s waste from a campus dining hall was just part of regular class activities for students in the School of Sustainability’s Urban Composting Systems solutions workshop.

Aaron Redman, a faculty associate within the Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS), co-instructs the course with Katja Brundiers, a GIOS academic associate. The pair designed the class – comprised of six graduate and 16 undergraduate students – to asses ASU’s food-waste system, develop a reasonable vision of a sustainable food-waste system, and build strategies that help transition from current practices towards a sustainable system.

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Scientists from U.S. and Mexico advance international sustainability science curriculum at second workshop

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

April 27, 2011

Dr. Dominguez Perez Tejada (center), director of UNAM's Institute of Ecology, considers proposed program learning objectives along with Dr. Cavazos (left) and Dr. Escalante (right) of CICESE.

Three graduate students from the School of Sustainability (Ben Warner, Chrissie Bausch, and Mark Wood) discuss their experiences in sustainability education with participants.

Dr. Redman describes the challenges and opportunities in interdisciplinary research.



How can Mexico take care of its world-class biodiversity in the face of climate change and other threats? On April 13-15, a multidisciplinary group of researchers from Mexico met for the second time with ASU sustainability scientists and specialists in a workshop on the Tempe campus to advance the development of an international sustainability science curriculum for Mexico’s universities.

The goal is to collaboratively design a new international master’s degree in sustainability that will train the next generation of Mexican ecological practitioners and policymakers to protect Mexico’s rich ecological resources.

At the workshop, 14 members of ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability and School of Sustainability worked with 10 researchers from two prominent Mexican institutions — the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and the Center for Scientific Research and Graduate Education (CICESE). UNAM researchers represented fields including ecology, biology, climatology, engineering, and ecosystem research.

During three days of meetings, the attendees from Mexico studied pedagogical approaches in sustainability science education, derived lessons from ASU’s experience developing the School of Sustainability’s curriculum, and learned formal approaches to curriculum development and implementation.

The group also reached agreement on three key issues: a broad vision for the new curriculum at UNAM, eight program level learning objectives, and five general content areas (modules) that will form the core of the program.

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Bonnie Nixon Named Executive Director of The Sustainability Consortium

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

April 26, 2011

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY and UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Press Release

April 26, 2011

Bonnie Nixon Named Executive Director of The Sustainability Consortium

Bonny NixonThe Sustainability Consortium has announced Bonnie Nixon, formerly Hewlett Packard’s Director of Environmental Sustainability, as Executive Director. Nixon will be responsible for developing and implementing short- and long-term strategies and growing the organization to include international representation, additional non–governmental organizations (NGO’s), toy and apparel sectors, and the world’s leading life cycle scientists and research institutions.

"It is really exciting to be involved in the science behind improving product footprints and empowering more sustainable production, buying and consumption patterns. The Sustainability Consortium represents an enormous opportunity to make systemic change for social equity, the environment and the economy,” said Nixon.

The Sustainability Consortium (http://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org) develops transparent methodologies, tools and strategies to drive a new generation of products and supply networks that address environmental, social and economic imperatives.

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2011 green college guide released; Arizona State University makes the list.

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

April 26, 2011

If you’re preparing to send a high school student off to college and want to learn more about the prospective university’s sustainability record then Princeton Review’s 2011 Guide to 311 Green Colleges is for you. The Princeton Review and the U.S. Green Building Council joined forces on this year’s edition, which is available as a free download from the Princeton Review website.


The guide includes 308 colleges or universities in the United States and three institutions in Canada. Each of these schools received a score of 80 or higher in the 2010 Princeton Review Green Rating survey.


Read the full story here.


Download the four-part PDF guide here: The Princeton Review’s Guide to 311 Green Colleges Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

'Ditch the Dumpster' Initiative Wins President's Award for Sustainability

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

April 14, 2011

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY Press Release

April 14, 2011

Year-end donation and recycling drive earns honors for diverting waste while supporting local charities.

TEMPE, Ariz.— Every year the average U.S. student throws away nearly 200 pounds of ‘stuff’ during end-of-the-year move-out from dorms and other student housing. To turn all that stuff into gold, Arizona State University (ASU) joined with Swift Charities for Children and student housing communities (Capstone Companies and American Campus Communities) to sponsor the Ditch the Dumpster project, an annual year-end donation and recycling drive.

In recognition of the drive’s mission, Ditch the Dumpster was one of the few projects to receive the 2011 ASU President’s Award for Sustainability (awarded on April 13, 2011).

Launched in 2008, ASU’s Ditch the Dumpster initiative is held at the end of every academic year to encourage students to donate or recycle their unwanted, usable items rather than simply toss them in the trash. Over the past three years, the initiative has grown exponentially and students learn about the benefits and value of recycling and reusing.

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Neely Foundation Funds Student Grant Program for Sustainability Research and Applied Projects on Food and Agriculture

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

April 13, 2011

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

MEDIA ADVISORY

April 13, 2011

Neely Foundation Funds Student Grant Program for Sustainability Research and Applied Projects on Food and Agriculture

May 4 deadline for $1000-$4000 applied research awards; awards to be determined by May 15

Who/Eligibility:

Graduate students in the School of Sustainability and senior and junior undergraduate sustainability majors.

What:

The C.W. and Modene Neely Foundation of Gilbert, Ariz., has awarded a grant to ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability to support graduate and undergraduate student research and applied projects.

The Neely Foundation Food and Agriculture Sustainability Research Grants Program offers funding for ASU sustainability student-proposed research and applied projects designed to support and advance food and agricultural system sustainability. Projects can cover any aspect of food and agricultural systems and range from local to global in scope. Most winning projects may expect $1000-$4000. Awards will be determined by May 15, 2011.

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