ASU Wrigley Institute News

ASU achieves gold in sustainability rating system

March 11, 2014

alt-transportation-graphics[1]Further bolstering its commitment to sustainability operations and practice, Arizona State University has achieved a Gold rating in the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS), a self-assessment program launched by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). ASU earned its highest points in engagement, and planning and administration.

“ASU has taken specific, measurable steps to incorporate sustainability as a value at an individual, as well as institutional, level,” said John Riley, the university’s sustainability operations officer. “Our STAR Gold rating reflects the continuing work of our entire university community.”

The STARS program was created by AASHE as a transparent tool for colleges and universities to measure and evaluate progress toward their institutional sustainability goals, taking into account not only environmental factors like energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, but also social and economic factors such as engagement and purchasing, among others. The program also helps facilitate a larger dialogue among institutions of higher education regarding sustainability.

The full report can be accessed here.

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ASU partners to develop solar certification program in West Africa

March 10, 2014

IRENA-solar-training-West-AfricaThe International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and Arizona State University signed an agreement this week to develop a solar certification program for West Africa. The two institutions teamed up to promote and initiate the implementation of harmonized certification programs for technicians of off-grid, as well as grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems for the region. The program aims to develop workforce capacity for the deployment of solar PV systems, a fast-growing form of renewable energy with excellent potential for providing energy security and economic development.

The different levels of technician certification will improve customer confidence in both renewable energy technologies and the technicians who implement them. The program will also support the employability of technicians by providing them with recognized skill sets. In order to ensure these objectives are met, national and regional technical committees will oversee the development of technical competency standards for the solar certification training courses.

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AzCATI collaborates on project to grow algae in wastewater

March 10, 2014

algae_project_lightworksStudents and researchers from Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University and the University of Arizona are collaborating on an Arizona Board of Regents-funded project to grow algae using wastewater. The algae can then be harvested to create fuel, feed and food products. This collaboration aims to advance algae as an industry in Arizona, one that will produce valuable products and remediate wastewater while creating job opportunities for residents.

With expansive non-arable land suitable for algae farms and more than 330 sunny days per year to encourage algae growth through photosynthesis, Arizona serves as an ideal location for algae research. The Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation (AzCATI), located at ASU’s Polytechnic Campus in Mesa, is a hub for research, testing, and commercialization of algae-based products. These include biofuels, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and other algae biomass coproducts. The center also functions as a learning environment for the next generation of scientists and engineers.

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ACE presents ASU with first award for dynamic change

March 9, 2014

crow_receives_ace_award_ASU President Michael M. Crow accepted an inaugural award presented by the American Council on Education (ACE) on March 9 during its 96th Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif. According to ACE, the nation’s largest higher education organization, the new award recognizes a college or university that raised, rallied or repurposed resources to achieve dramatic and successful changes that allowed it to more fully fulfill its mission over a relatively brief period of time.

Crow has become nationally known for his commitment to innovation and for reinventing the research university model to emphasize access and excellence. Faculty members are encouraged to pursue use-inspired research, and the university has worked to improve the environment through its creation of the Global Institute of Sustainability and School of Sustainability. Joan Wodiska, ACE vice president and chief leadership officer, said, “This award shines a bright light on the successes in America’s higher education system, the need for ongoing dynamic changes on college campuses and the next generation of great ideas for our nation and students.”

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ASU partners on groundbreaking sustainable development plan

March 7, 2014

ASU-Dutch-Sustainability-PlanThe Netherlands’ Municipality of Haarlemmermeer is working to become one of northern Europe’s centers for sustainability-driven commerce. Arizona State University is the United States’ leader in sustainability education and research. Together, along with private partners in the Haarlemmermeer region, ASU and the municipality are collaborating to create the world’s first regional plan based on the principles of a “circular economy.”

The project, “Haarlemmermeer Beyond Sustainability,” will be coordinated by the Global Sustainability Solutions Center at Haarlemmermeer, a program within the Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives at ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability. The center will create a regional visioning and planning strategy that will close resource loops in the most efficient, economical and sustainable manner possible. It will also act as facilitator for the municipality and various stakeholders in the region to define and outline the groundbreaking plan. The project includes designing the circular economy strategy and identifying closed loop energy, water, matter and other resource cycles that are pragmatic, market-based and adaptable for the region.

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Determination to find solutions takes student abroad

March 6, 2014

20140306-Global-Sustainability-Studies-Program-Alexis-Roeckner-Profile-DCIntrigued by the idea of comparing the sustainability policy of two countries, School of Sustainability student Alexis Roeckner traveled to Washington, D.C. and London as part of the Global Sustainability Studies Program last summer. Knowing that sustainability alone is a complex topic, Roeckner soon learned that its intricacies are compounded in the government setting, particularly in the United States.

Over the course of the program, Roeckner gained an in-depth understanding of policy-making in another country and a more realistic expectation of what can be achieved within the confines of government; she realizes that it takes a great deal of determination to pass sustainability-related legislation. With a new-found sense of independence and strengthened resolve, Roeckner’s future includes plans to pursue sustainability solutions in our nation’s capital.

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ASU scientists make models for microclimates

March 6, 2014

Ben-Ruddell-CAPLTER-microclimatesBen Ruddell, a senior sustainability scientist and assistant professor of engineering at Arizona State University, is part of a team using data to develop models for urban microclimates. A microclimate is a small atmospheric zone where the climate differs from the surrounding area, and can range in size from a single garden to neighborhood. Microclimates within a city are affected by a myriad of factors, such as shade, vegetation, moisture and building materials. A model that can predict the effects of changes made to microclimates can help us better engineer them for human health and comfort.

Ruddell’s team is working with Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP LTER) project to observe microclimates in neighborhoods throughout Phoenix and build a database. The data is then used for modeling that will help to engineer healthier, more comfortable and more efficient cities. For example, homeowners choosing between landscaping options can weigh the temperature-reducing effect of lawns and trees against the amount of water they require. In tackling this enormous task, the team hopes to create a system that allows for better decision-making on both individual and municipal scales.

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Engineering students earn award for sustainable water project

March 6, 2014

engineers-without-borders-kenyan-water-projectAn endeavor that began when members of Arizona State University’s student chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) connected with a Kenyan doctoral student has earned one of three 2014 Premier Project Awards from the national EWB-USA organization. The chapter was recognized at National Engineers Week, Feb. 16-22, for its work to design and construct sustainable water infrastructure in a rural Kenyan community, one of hundreds of projects that EWB-USA considered.

Since learning of the potable water scarcity in this region, fifteen chapter members have made one or more of four trips to the Bondo-Rarieda community of rural Kenya over the past three summers. These students used their engineering skills to construct systems for collecting and storing potable water, including a rainwater catchment facility. In addition to providing technical solutions, they worked to educate the community and ensure that its residents could maintain the sustainable water infrastructure independently. As a result of these improvements, residents of  Bondo-Rarieda are now able to store water for use during the region’s extensive dry season.

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DCDC co-director discusses water reuse on “Arizona Horizon”

March 4, 2014

dave-white-water-reuse-asu-magazineAs part of the state’s sustainability plans, a report on water reuse in Arizona and how to best delegate effluent was released by Arizona State University’s Decision Center for a Desert City (DCDC). “Arizona Horizon” host Ted Simons interviewed DCDC Co-Director and Senior Sustainability Scientist Dave White, who co-authored the report.

White shared that the aim of the report is to continue and stimulate conversation in the policy community about issues critical to the future of water in our state. “What we’re seeing is the potential for increased competition and cost for municipal effluent into the future,” White said. “We want people to have an open, transparent dialogue about what the best uses of this effluent are.”

Watch the interview here.

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Archaeologist illuminates the present by humanizing the past

March 4, 2014

Hegmon 08In exploring how humans of past civilizations experienced the world around them, ASU archaeologist and senior sustainability scientist Michelle Hegmon is generating interest in studies that the average reader might otherwise avoid. She refers to this unique approach – which humanizes research by exploring elements like suffering, mental illness and the attitudes people held toward their environments – as Archaeology of the Human Experience (AHE). Utilizing the AHE approach not only paints a more detailed picture of the past, but assists researchers in better understanding present circumstances.

Hegmon believes that the AHE approach can have an illuminating effect on sustainability studies, which numerous archaeologists now contribute to. In some instances, the roots of an environmentally exemplary modern society may be entangled with past oppression or inequality. Because an essential element of sustainability is satisfying human needs, AHE challenges us to asses whether the ends justified the means and to consider alternative methods for achieving similar results.

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Student increases awareness through cultural immersion

March 3, 2014

20140200-Global-Sustainability-Studies-Program-Chad-Ecuador-ProfileThrough the Global Sustainability Studies Program, School of Sustainability student Chad Sharrard studied the cultural element of sustainable development in the Andes region of Ecuador. Over the course of the summer, he gathered that development requires an understanding of what matters most to the people of a specific place.

After seeing the numerous stakeholders involved in sustainable development in the Andes, Sharrard gained a better understanding of why decisions are sometimes the result of economic and ethical considerations rather than environmental ones. Being immersed in another culture also provided him with an opportunity to apply what he had learned from textbooks and PowerPoints to a real-world situation. He feels that he will better retain these lessons now that they are tied to his memories of Ecuador.

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ASU collaborators explore the future of Phoenix

February 26, 2014

visualization-scenarios-darren-petrucci-rider-foleyHow will Phoenix’s future urban spaces emerge, and what might these scenarios mean for environmental, economic and social sustainability? Senior Sustainability Scientist Darren Petrucci and School of Sustainability alumnus Rider Foley presented one tool for answering such questions at the “New Tools for Science Policy” breakfast seminar, hosted by ASU’s Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (CSPO) in Washington, D.C. on Feb. 28.

Their technology works by mapping Phoenix’s trajectory and determining how it came to be the city it currently is.  “From there, we could begin to extrapolate where the urban form and growth might go,” says Petrucci. Keeping in mind the forces that underlie technology’s interplay with urban evolution – including competing desires like economic growth, access to clean water, security, and the sustainable use of natural resources – they created visualization scenarios in video format. These scenarios encourage viewers to consider their current decisions and how they may impact the future.

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CAP LTER research assistant receives engineering award

February 25, 2014

tom-voloThomas Volo, a doctoral student in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, was one of two ASU engineers to be honored at a Feb. 20 event.

Volo, who is a graduate research assistant with the Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP LTER) project, studies urban landscape irrigation and the ecohydrology of desert cities. His research uses numerical modeling and eddy covariance techniques to investigate the impacts of landscape irrigation on urban surface energy and soil moisture fluxes. He seeks to conserve urban water use through improved scheduling for residential irrigation.

Volo was recognized at the Greater Phoenix Area 2014 Engineers Week awards ceremony as the Engineering Student of the Year. He was honored along with engineering professor Keith Hjelmstad, who was named Engineering Educator of the Year.

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Leaders discuss Arizona’s new energy plan at Solar Summit

February 24, 2014

solar-summit-keynote-william-harrisPolicy leaders, industry partners and energy experts gathered at ASU SkySong Feb. 20 to discuss the future of solar energy in Arizona at Arizona Solar Summit IV. The event featured the first public unveiling of the state’s new master energy plan, “emPOWER Arizona: Executive Energy Assessment and Pathways.” Gov. Jan Brewer signed the executive order on Feb. 18, making it the state’s first comprehensive energy plan in more than 20 years.

The Arizona Solar Summit – hosted by Arizona State University LightWorks, ASU SkySong and the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, and sponsored by NRG – provided the first opportunity for the public to learn about the master plan. Leisa Brug, Brewer’s energy policy advisor and director of the Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, led a panel discussion on the plan and its goals. Brug said that Arizona is already ahead of other states in terms of energy policy, and the new master plan will help the state continue to be a national leader in the field.

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OKED leader has sunny outlook on sustainable energy in Arizona

February 20, 2014

office-knowledge-enterprise-development-sethuraman-panch-panchanathanSethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan discusses energy research in his latest column in The Arizona Republic. Panchanathan is the senior vice president for ASU’s Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development.

Panchanathan describes the importance of developing and advancing sustainable and affordable sources of energy. He provides examples of how ASU researchers are working in related areas, such as renewable fuels from algae and cyanobacteria, solar panels and photovoltaics, as well as the work happening with policymakers to ensure that our legal, social and economic systems can support renewable energy solutions.

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ASU panel finds common ground on climate change

February 19, 2014

climate-change-rescuing-policy-panelBuilding a more functional conversation among researchers, policymakers, citizens and industrial leaders is critical to address the global challenge of climate change, argued panelists at the “Rescuing Climate Policy” panel at ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability on Feb. 5. Kristen Hwang, a journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, reported on the panel for Slate magazine’s Future Tense channel.

At the event, panelists argued that to prevent environmental wars and global unrest, the international community needs to work together to aggressively combat climate change and remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

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Sun Devil Fans Eliminate Trash in 2OT Victory Over No. 2 Wildcats

February 18, 2014

By Lindsay Gaesser, SDA Media Relations

sun-devil-basketball-zero-wasteTEMPE, Ariz.—The Arizona State men’s basketball team wasted no effort in its double-overtime win against in-state rival Arizona on Feb. 14, and neither did the fans.  As a part of Sun Devil Athletics’ Zero Waste Initiative, a bipartisan crowd of 10,754 at Wells Fargo Arena achieved a waste diversion rate of 87 percent.

The Territorial Cup® matchup created 656 pounds and 708 pounds of recycled and compostable materials, respectively, while just 197 pounds of trash was sent to the landfill. Arizona State is reporting the rate as a part of the RecycleMania Game Day Basketball Challenge.

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Artificial leaf jumps developmental hurdle

February 18, 2014

Photo by: Michael Hagelberg
Photo by: Michael Hagelberg

In a recent early online edition of Nature Chemistry, ASU scientists, along with colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory, have reported advances toward perfecting a functional artificial leaf.

Designing an artificial leaf that uses solar energy to convert water cheaply and efficiently into hydrogen and oxygen is one of the goals of BISfuel – the Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the Department of Energy, in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Arizona State University.

Hydrogen is an important fuel in itself and serves as an indispensible reagent for the production of light hydrocarbon fuels from heavy petroleum feed stocks. Society requires a renewable source of fuel that is widely distributed, abundant, inexpensive and environmentally clean.

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Resilience, Sustainability, and Social Justice

Thought Leader Series

February 17, 2014

A Thought Leader Series Piece

By David Eisenman

Note: February 20, 2014, is the United Nations’ World Day of Social Justice. The goal of the observance is to remove barriers people face due to gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture, or disability. Dr. David Eisenman’s expertise is in public health and disasters.

In their book, “Resilience – Why Things Bounce Back,” authors Andrew Zolli and Ann Marie Healy argue that it’s time for sustainability to move over and make room for resilience.

Suddenly it seems to me that the whole world is talking about sustainability and resilience. In the field of disasters – my field – both are important concepts, complementary to each other and worthy of action and resources.

But frequently missing from the discussion is one of the most important determinants of sustainability and resilience – social justice. Social justice is central to both.

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Wu delivers keynote at socio-environmental synthesis workshop

February 17, 2014

Sustainability scientist Jianguo Wu delivered a keynote presentation at a Socio-Environmental Synthesis Research Proposal Writing Workshop, hosted in Annapolis, Md., by the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center in January.

The themes of the event, “Cities in Sustainable Resource Management” and “Surprise in Human Adaptation to Environmental Change,” were selected as examples of dynamic, complex socio-environmental problems that require the collaboration of disparate fields—from urban planning to oceanography and data science to human psychology—to begin to solve.

Dr. Wu is a Dean’s Distinguished Professor of Sustainability Science, and his research areas include landscape ecology, urban ecology, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and sustainability science.