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Sustainability News

ASU and Mexican experts design sustainability program to save biodiversity

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

December 1, 2010

School of Sustainability faculty members outline workshop activities
School of Sustainability faculty members (L-R) Hallie Eakin and Arnim Wiek outline workshop activities and outcomes with three of their collaborators from the National Autonomous University of Mexico — Patricia Guereca, Institute of Engineering, Luis Zambrano, Institute of Biology, and Marisa Mazari, Institute of Ecology.

Mexico is one of the most biodiverse regions of our planet. In number of species, it currently ranks first in reptiles and amphibians, third in mammals, and fourth in plants.

To help protect this legacy, ecology experts from Mexico’s largest university met with ASU sustainability faculty and staff on Nov. 18-19 to collaboratively design a new international master’s degree in sustainability that will train the next generation of Mexican ecological practitioners and policymakers.

The two-day workshop is a key part of a collaboration between ASU’s School of Sustainability and the Institute of Ecology of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (IE-UNAM), one of Latin America’s most prominent university systems. It was co-organized by School of Sustainability faculty members Hallie Eakin, who also manages the project, and Arnim Wiek, one of the project’s principal investigators.

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Kristin Mayes chosen to head new program on law and sustainability

ASU Sustainability News

December 1, 2010

Kristin K. Mayes
Kristin Mayes, Law Professor

Kristin K. Mayes, an Arizona Corporation Commissioner who has helped Arizona become a national model for energy innovation, has been chosen to head the new Program on Law and Sustainability at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

Mayes will serve as Professor of Practice and Faculty Director of the new program, created in partnership with ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability, where Mayes will be Senior Sustainability Scientist.

“Kris Mayes is a major national innovator in developing new paradigms for how utility companies and utility regulators will need to operate in the coming decades,” said College of Law Dean Paul Schiff Berman. “Kris joins Dan Bodansky, hired last year, and together they immediately will catapult this new program to a position of international leadership in an area of law and policy that is crucial both to our nation's economic future and our planet’s long-term survival.”

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Student pursues sustainable living, organizes efforts campuswide

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

November 22, 2010

Natalie Fleming, a junior majoring in sustainability, is one of about 200 ASU students living in Sustainability House at Barrett (SHAB), the sustainable-living community at Barrett, the Honors College. Her push for the environment extends campuswide, however, as she organizes events and leads a team for the student-led Center for Student Sustainability Initiatives, which she helped found.

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‘No Impact Week’ encourages students to live greener

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

November 15, 2010

Arizona State University kicked off its No Impact Week on Sunday, November 14. The eight-day initiative, sponsored by the Global Institute of Sustainability, encourages students on the Tempe campus to live greener through daily themes including: consumption, waste, transportation, food, energy, and water.

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Energize Phoenix Revs Up $25M in Grants

Features ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

November 2, 2010

The city of Phoenix began accepting funding applications Tuesday from multi-family housing owners along a 10-mile stretch of the Phoenix light rail corridor. $25 million in grants are available under the Energize Phoenix program, a joint public-private program that seeks to provide energy efficiency measures for about 2,000 homes and more than 30 million square feet of commercial and industrial space.

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Ensuring long-term health of global ecosystems

ASU Sustainability News

October 26, 2010

Q&A with Ann Kinzig

Dr. Ann Kinzig

Dr. Kinzig on a research trip in Arizona’s Sky Islands region near the Mexico border.

Dr. Kinzig assesses Panama ecosystems with a colleague from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Dr. Kinzig assesses Panama ecosystems with a colleague from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

salt production

In Tanzania’s Saadani National Park, salt production coexists with ecotourism to supplement a traditional fishing economy.

Ann Kinzig is chief research strategist for the Global Institute of Sustainability, affiliated faculty in the School of Sustainability, and professor in the School of Life Sciences. In her research, she studies ecosystem services, interactions between conservation and development, and the resilience of natural resource systems. She also teaches courses in biodiversity and ecosystem services, urban ecology, current environmental issues, and undergraduate research training.

What triggered your focus on sustainability?


As a graduate student in 1989 with an M.A. degree in physics, I decided to expand my horizons. I went to work with John Holdren (now President Obama’s science advisor) at Berkeley – basically thinking systemically about society’s natural resources and energy requirements and the types of economic and political preconditions for successfully managing them. Two years later, as I was feeling increasingly drawn to the life sciences, the Ecological Society of America published their Sustainable Biosphere Initiative. This was a clarion call for me. Here, suddenly, was a field that allowed one to not only do interesting science, but also help save the world.

What are your most important sustainability-related research projects?


I am wrapping up Advancing Conservation in a Social Context, a grant with the MacArthur Foundation aimed at improving ways to identify, analyze, and negotiate the complex trade-offs between conservation and development. After five years, we can say that conservation organizations are getting better at navigating the trade-offs, but numerous challenges remain. For example, many beneficial natural systems remain undervalued, in part because we lack mechanisms for making difficult choices among different ecosystem services (some of which are delivered globally) and incorporating the value of these services into decision-making at the local level. In response, I plan to work with colleagues at Conservation International to model how ecosystem services are delivered under different policies and landscape configurations. This work builds on an ongoing collaboration between the ASU ecoServices group (faculty and students focused on international biodiversity projects) and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama.

How can your research affect real-world policy decisions?


Our models can tell decision-makers and managers how local policies will affect landscapes and the wider flows of ecosystem services. For example, we are currently working in the Panama Canal Watershed to model the ecosystems that provide water for the locks. If the delivery of water were substantially diminished, the world would see major consequences for global shipping and trade. Our goal is to identify the best landscape configurations for both local and global benefits.

What is the world sustainability challenge that concerns you most?


First, I am concerned about our capacity to understand and manage complex adaptive systems. We have to recognize that these systems are not linear or fully predictable and that policy decisions must be revisited as we monitor results and correct course. A second challenge is that most of our major environmental issues transcend national boundaries. We need global governance mechanisms in place to deal with this.

What are your plans as new chief research strategist for the Global Institute of Sustainability?


My goal is to launch a collective exercise among faculty to imagine what sustainability science should look like a decade from now if it is to serve society. We need to identify both the looming challenges and the gaps in meeting those challenges, and then decide which gaps we at ASU want to fill. One example may be to join our strengths in energy technologies with our knowledge about society and decision-making to improve our understanding of the potential promise and unintended consequences of next-generation energy technologies. Few places examine innovation from both a technological and social perspective, but it is essential in meeting global challenges in a timely fashion without creating new hazards.

October 26, 2010

Scientists From Around the Globe Convene to Address Urbanization, Land, and Climate Change

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

October 12, 2010

ASU hosts two international conferences to advance sustainability efforts and progress                

PHOENIX/TEMPE, Ariz. – Reinforcing its role as a leader in interdisciplinary global environmental and climate change conversations, Arizona State University (ASU) will host conferences for both the International Conference on Urbanization and Global Environmental Change (UGEC) and the Global Land Project’s (GLP) Open Science Meeting.

How have humans changed the Earth’s surface? How do urbanization and global environmental change interface? What are new pathways for sustainability that link urbanization and land change? How can we adapt to changes that have already occurred?

These themes play significantly in both of the groups’ individual and joint conferences. They are also top of mind among next-phase thinkers in the fields of environment and sustainability and are expected to play prominently in upcoming agenda-setting reports.

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Tracking air pollution to its sources

ASU Sustainability News

September 30, 2010

Q&A with Matt Fraser

Matt Fraser

Dr. Matt Fraser

Dr. Fraser is director of research development for the Global Institute of Sustainability and associate professor in the School of Sustainability. Dr. Fraser’s primary research focuses on urban air quality with particular emphasis on developing methods to identify, monitor, and control ambient air pollution. He also oversees the Institute’s sustainability-related research portfolio and teaches courses on sustainable energy, materials, and technology.





What triggered your career focus on sustainability?

When I was an undergraduate, I was studying chemical engineering; studying about petroleum refining and chemical manufacturing and things like that. I realized that I wanted to focus more on the natural environment; the chemical reactions that are occurring in the atmosphere and how things are transported throughout the atmosphere.

At some point, I started to realize that no matter how environmentally conscious we were, if we didn’t address the insatiable demand that we have for energy and for water and for manufactured goods, we could never be sustainable. No matter how environmentally benign or environmentally conscious you are, if you have an insatiable demand, that just can’t be sustained. So, at some point I started thinking what is the long-term trajectory? Where are we going with our water systems, with our energy systems, with our manufacturing systems and what is the longer-term future for our society? That really focused my—triggered my focus on sustainability.

What are your two most important sustainability-related projects?

The first is our outdoor air quality work. We do a lot of work understanding the source of ambient air quality and the pollution in the outdoor environment. This is one of our ambient air quality samplers. What these samplers do is they pull air through a filter. That filter collects the particles that are suspended in the atmosphere. The reason that we do this is we want to take the particles that are suspended in the atmosphere, collect them on the filter, return that filter to our laboratory where we can do a series of detailed chemical analyses to figure out what the chemical composition of these particles is. Now the reason that we do this is understanding the chemical composition is vital as far as determining what the original source of those particles was. So if we want to reduce the ambient particles in the environment, we figure out what sources are contributing and then we go and control those most important sources. This type of work is vital for environmental regulators to understand which sources should be controlled and to develop effective control strategies.

How does this research affect real world problems?

One of the reasons we are most concerned about these particles is obviously if they’re in the ambient environment, people are going to breathe these particles in. When you breathe these particles in, they interfere with your respiratory system, they can trigger asthma attacks or worsen existing respiratory disease, and they also give an additional burden to your cardiopulmonary system. They lower your lung function which makes your heart work harder to pump oxygen throughout your body, so it’s a real health concern and controlling these particles is very important towards human health.

What is your second sustainability-related project?

The second project deals with indoor air quality. With a lot of focus on energy efficiency retrofits, we want to understand what the effect of energy efficiency retrofits is on indoor air quality and health. What we’re doing is looking at the before and after air quality in a building that is undergoing an energy efficiency retrofit. Because often these retrofits seal the building envelope keeping the hot air out and the cool air in here in Phoenix, and so it’s important to understand whether those retrofits trap indoor sources of air pollution.

What we’re doing is we’re measuring indoor air quality at an apartment complex for seniors, and we’re concerned about seniors because they are some of the more vulnerable members of our population to environmental burdens. What we’re doing is we’ve done sampling in 72 different apartments at a senior apartment complex before the energy efficiency retrofit. The retrofit is going on now. And we’re going to do indoor air quality sampling after to see if sealing the building envelope affects the indoor concentrations of pollutants. At the same time, we’re most concerned about the health of the seniors and so we’re working with the College of Nursing and Health Innovation here at ASU to do a health survey which will be administered again before the retrofit and after the retrofit so we can figure out what link there is between indoor air quality and their health, and whether the building retrofit has had an impact on health.

Instead of using the big noisy pumps that we use for ambient air quality sampling, we’re using these portable sensors, and we’re deploying these at different locations throughout the apartment complex to figure out what the indoor and outdoor concentrations of pollutants are.

How will this project affect policymaking?

It’s vitally important to understand the role of energy efficient retrofits on indoor air quality. For example, right now, in the Global Institute of Sustainability, we are working with the city of Phoenix on a $25 million project funded by the Department of Energy to promote energy efficiency retrofits, so we have to better understand the role of energy efficiency and sealing the building envelope on indoor air quality because it will directly affect residents’ health.

What sustainability challenge concerns you most?

When I think about sustainability challenges, the one that I’m most concerned about is climate change. When I think about climate change, you immediately think of our energy systems because our energy right now is linked to fossil fuels, and we need to have energy to continue to provide a better livelihood for people across the globe. But climate change is more than just energy and the atmosphere. It’s also the other systems such as water and our food systems and how we build our cities. All these have to be adapted in the future to mitigate climate and that’s what concerns me the most.

September 30, 2010

ASU Classroom and Chef Serve Up Sustainability

ASU Sustainability News

September 24, 2010

This year’s crop of plant biology students will use more than their brains to learn, if Arizona State University professor Jeffrey Klopatek has a hand in it.

Klopatek, a culinary savant and climate change professor in the School of Life Sciences in ASU’s College of Liberal Art and Sciences, is attempting to cultivate undergraduates’ gut instincts. To do this, Klopatek has planted a fork in the proverbial scholarly road. He has veered from the norm to create his own menu for a dynamic, hands-on plant biology curriculum built around sustainability and food choices.

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New 'Green' Minor for Major Change

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases School of Sustainability News

September 10, 2010

Arizona State University broadens scope of sustainability education offerings

TEMPE, Ariz. – Arizona State University (ASU) has launched a new minor in sustainability that can complement a student’s major in another academic discipline. This unique 18 credit hour program enables undergraduate students to explore the challenges of sustainability and learn what determines the sustainability of human institutions, organizations, cultures, and technologies in different environments at the local, national, and international levels.

The minor offered this fall, 2010, marks a milestone for ASU’s initiative to make sustainability education and practices university-wide across all four campuses.

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Unearthing long-term sustainability strategies

ASU Sustainability News

August 30, 2010

Q&A with Margaret Nelson

Dr. Nelson admires a classic Mimbres black-on-white pot of the 11th century style

Dr. Nelson admires a classic Mimbres black-on-white pot of the 11th century style.

Three pottery vessels from the 12th century combine old and emerging styles

Three pottery vessels from the 12th century combine old and emerging styles.

Soil from a 12th century pueblo in southwest New Mexico is carefully sifted to recover artifacts

Soil from a 12th century pueblo in southwest New Mexico is carefully sifted to recover artifacts.

Dr. Nelson is a professor in the School of Sustainability and the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and is Vice Dean of Barrett, the Honors College. Her research involves collaborative fieldwork to understand sustainability issues for prehistoric inhabitants of the U.S. Southwest and the lessons that can be learned for contemporary society. Her innovations in teaching have earned her the ASU President’s Professor Award, Professor of the Year honors from the ASU Parents Association, and the Centennial Professor designation by the Associated Students of ASU. Nelson teaches graduate and undergraduate seminars in interdisciplinary research for the School of Sustainability.

Dr. Nelson is a professor in the School of Sustainability and the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and is Vice Dean of Barrett, the Honors College. Her research involves collaborative fieldwork to understand sustainability issues for prehistoric inhabitants of the U.S. Southwest and the lessons that can be learned for contemporary society. Her innovations in teaching have earned her the ASU President’s Professor Award, Professor of the Year honors from the ASU Parents Association, and the Centennial Professor designation by the Associated Students of ASU. Nelson teaches graduate and undergraduate seminars in interdisciplinary research for the School of Sustainability.

How did “sustainability” become part of your research focus?


In 1999 the Turner Foundation awarded my research partner and me a three-year grant to study how the Mimbres culture in southwestern New Mexico practiced sustainable land use. With the help of further grants by the Turner Foundation, National Geographic, and the National Science Foundation, we began collaborating with a group of archaeologists and ecologists working in the U.S. Southwest and northern Mexico to understand issues of sustainability and resilience over long time spans.

What is your most important sustainability-related research project?


I lead an interdisciplinary research group from the fields of ecology and anthropology who are conducting integrated projects that examine cycles of stability and transformation during the last 1,000 years in the U.S. Southwest and northern Mexico. The projects focus on a number of key assumptions about resilience and sustainability that have never before been studied across such long periods. Our work involves building an extended record of evidence that explains how issues such as diversity, robustness, vulnerability, and social rigidity can contribute to a society’s stability or collapse.

How do you think your sustainability-related research can affect decisions in the “real world”?


Policymakers and managers currently make decisions based on recent evidence and short-term consequences. Our work provides a considerably longer record of evidence about the processes that either contribute to or interfere with resilience and sustainability. With this much broader understanding, decision-makers have the tools to make better choices for a sustainable future that is lasting.

What is the world sustainability challenge that concerns you the most?


I cannot pick only one. Among the concerns on my list are social isolation policies, high population, abysmal quality of life for many, inattention to future consequences, and lack of education.

August 30, 2010

Leading Expert in Business Science and Supply Chain Management Appointed to Co-Direct The Sustainability Consortium

Institute Press Releases

August 10, 2010

TEMPE, Ariz.—Professor Kevin Dooley has been appointed Interim Co-Director of The Sustainability Consortium for Arizona State University (ASU). Dooley, a Distinguished Professor of Supply Chain Management in the W. P. Carey School of Business and Affiliate Professor in the School of Sustainability, has deep knowledge and experience with the Consortium and its activities. Jon Johnson will continue as the Consortium's Co-Director for the University of Arkansas. Johnson is the Walton College Professor of Sustainability, Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas.

The Sustainability Consortium develops transparent methodologies, tools and strategies to drive a new generation of products and supply networks that address environmental, social and economic imperatives.

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Dr. Elinor Ostrom - ASU Professor & Nobel Laureate

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

August 4, 2010

Q&A with Nobel Laureate Dr. Elinor Ostrom Finding the key to sustaining shared resources Elinor Ostrom is a research professor at the School of Human Evolution and Social Change in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and is founding director of the Center for the Study of Institutional Diversity.

In 2009, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics for her work in economic governance, particularly as it applies to shared resources such as pastures, fisheries, and groundwater basins. Her research examines ways that institutions and users operating at widely different scales can work together to sustain such resources.

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ASU named one of nation's best and greenest colleges

ASU Sustainability News School of Sustainability News

August 4, 2010

Arizona State University has made the “Green Honor Roll,” rating as one of the nation's 18 "greenest" universities, and is named among the top 120 Best Western Colleges.

This is the third year in a row that ASU made The Princeton Review’s list of most environmentally friendly institutions – a list that salutes the institutions that received the highest possible score, 99, in this year's rating tallies.

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Novozymes joins The Sustainability Consortium – a global effort to improve product sustainability

ASU Sustainability News Institute Press Releases

August 2, 2010

BAGSVAERD, Denmark – August 2, 2010 – Novozymes has become a founding member of The Sustainability Consortium, a new global organization with aims to improve the sustainability of consumer products. The company will join a diverse group of academics, governments, non-government organizations and businesses to fulfill The Sustainability Consortium’s mission of driving a new generation of products and supply networks that address environmental, social and economic imperatives. Other members include Dell, Disney, Wal-Mart, WWF and BASF to name a few.

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Finding the key to sustaining shared resources

ASU Sustainability News

July 30, 2010

Q&A with Elinor Ostrom

Dr. Elinor Ostrom

Nobel Laureate Dr. Elinor Ostrom

Dr. Ostrom (1933-2012) was a research professor at the School of Human Evolution and Social Change in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and was founding director of the Center for the Study of Institutional Diversity. In 2009, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics for her work in economic governance, particularly as it applies to shared resources such as pastures, fisheries, and groundwater basins. Her research examined ways that institutions and users operating at widely different scales can work together to sustain such resources.



Arnim Wiek: Lin, thank you very much for agreeing to have a little interview here in the preparation of the International Conference on Sustainability Science in Rome in June. We have structured the conference along different streams, and I’d like to chat a little bit with you about three different challenges we try to address here.

Elinor Ostrom: Good. Good.

Arnim Wiek: The first one is – and all of them I have kind of selected to make it kind of relevant to also with what you’ve been working on in the field of sustainability science and governance issues. The first one is everybody knows you have been working very, very extensively on local governance issues – on the local level and getting a good sense for how people self-govern and self-organize.

Elinor Ostrom: May self-govern.

Arnim Wiek: “May,” yes exactly. May self-govern natural resources and the interactions between societal demand on the one hand side, and natural capacities on the other hand. My question is – we have one stream that is focusing on global governance.

Elinor Ostrom: Uh huh.

Arnim Wiek: The big question I think that is circulating in our field for many, many years is how do we use your insights from the more local/regional level for insights on the global level?

Elinor Ostrom: Well one of the big insights we have, going way back to our study of metropolitan governance and urban services, is that it is rare that there is just one level that is the level for everything. So, if we take metropolitan governance first, what we showed is that while there were some services better performed at a big metropolitan area, there were many others that were better performed at a smaller or medium. Vincent Ostrom and Charlie Tiebout and others developed the concept of polycentricity: multiple units at different scales that had developed – potentially, if it was a polycentric system – ways of working together, and that’s never perfect, but at least ways of doing so.

Well if you think about a polycentric approach to global warming, then I think we can start using some of the lessons. Some people don’t know about the earlier work, but the lessons of polycentricity are that if you can organize some things at very small and medium and large and find ways of getting them to relate, you could usually do a lot better. Global warming, I argue, has been misconceptualized. It’s been looked at as you, an individual, you produce something, and it goes oom! [pointing upward] only. Well, that’s wrong. So the pollutants that you –when you drive, your car is producing pollutants – some of them are local.

You’re finding that you have a lot of money being paid for gas. Well that’s family. Your health isn’t as good as it could be if you biked. That’s you, so individual, family, local. If we can find more ways of encouraging those things; not that you are going to solve – by solving some of the local and regional – are going to solve global, but it has an impact.

What we need to be doing is the innovative programs around the world that are working on it – and there are – understand how they work, enhance the probabilities others will do it. To some extent, we challenge our national leaders, “Okay you guys, there are ways of doing this and move on.” We need the global, but we just wait for it.

Arnim Wiek: Right, right, right.

Elinor Ostrom: Bad.

Arnim Wiek: Yeah, don’t wait.

Elinor Ostrom: Don’t wait, move and then push to get the global as well.

Arnim Wiek: Yeah and this is on the – this is on the causing side as well as the effect side right? I mean when we play out and say, “How does this actually impact on the local level?” It is again tangible and people can relate to it.

Elinor Ostrom: Yeah. They found, for example, they’ve done a recent study on the impact of metropolitan pollution efforts in metropolitan areas where they have substantially reduced pollutants. Some of the life long – the average expected life is two to three years more. Well, that’s a fairly substantial thing for a big population.

Arnim Wiek: Yeah. Yeah.

Elinor Ostrom: So that also reduced global problems, but so it’s how we think of it differently.

Arnim Wiek: Right. Excellent. The second stream we are concerned about, I think not only in this conference, but also in our emerging field of sustainability science is that we have defined this field already a decade ago as a strong problem-oriented field. So we are concerned about how do we address problems? The point is that there is quite some debate about that we are getting better and better in understanding and analyzing these problems.

The question is: at the same time sustainability science is encouraged to make a strong contribution to the solution of the problems, how do we bridge this gap between getting very, very rigorous understanding of the problems to actually creating strong solutions for these problems? Some might argue this is not really in the domain of science of any longer. This needs to be then policy domain, but some might argue well this is actually still in the science domain.

Elinor Ostrom: If they’re not linked, we’re in trouble and so part of our problem is how we link science and policy. So, not all policy scientists are going to do all of the hard work on the biophysical side and vice versa, but if we don’t develop communities that can communicate with one another, then we don’t make anything other than progress on one. And I will argue that you won’t have progress on the policy if they don’t understand the problem.

Further, we won’t make much progress if we think there’s a single solution, and so part of our problem is how do we study a variety of efforts that were successful or failed.

Arnim Wiek: Right.

Elinor Ostrom: Failures are very important to study because what we may find that successes have eight variables and failures have six of the eight but not two.

Arnim Wiek: Yes.

Elinor Ostrom: We are dealing with complex problems and complex solutions, and we need to understand the complexity of both.

Arnim Wiek: We have another stream in our conference. It’s focusing on education for sustainability. We have a PhD seminar and special stream on sustainability and education. The question that is kind of circulating in our field is how can we teach a field that is still in development? What are kind of the critical challenges we need to overcome in order to strengthen our field and to develop a strong position our students can gain from?

Elinor Ostrom: Well, partly, you need both to be training students in the diverse sciences, and no one student should learn everything. But then what are the fora for discussions where there’s respect across disciplines and getting that community – that’s a sense of community that we’re struggling with issues that people who are just disciplinary aren’t. In order to do that, we’re going to have to learn a little bit more about some of these questions. Right now I have some of my students really looking into GIS and remote sensing because I think being able to do over time and spatial and temporal in the same analysis is very powerful for us.

This is very technical, so not all of my students need to do this or are interested. They’ve got to be fascinated; but around our seminar tables, we’ve discussed some of the assets of GIS and remote sensing enough that people are beginning to understand some of the lessons that they can learn. They don’t have to do it themselves, but they’ve got to respect what they can get from that form of analysis: and that is, it takes a while just to develop that but that’s the kind of community you need to be developing. We need all of us.

Arnim Wiek: Yes. Absolutely. Absolutely. Great. Thank you very much Lin for sharing some of your thoughts related to this conference with us.

Elinor Ostrom: I wish I could join you for it, but – [Laughing]

Arnim Wiek: Next time.

Elinor Ostrom: Yes, that would be nice.

July 30, 2010

Is Arizona Poised to Take the Solar Lead? Az SMART Project Will Help Homeowners, Businesses, Leaders

Institute Press Releases

July 13, 2010

TEMPE, Ariz. (July 13, 2010) — Is Arizona prepared to take the lead in the shift to renewable energy, using its greatest natural resource – the sun? A major research effort led by Arizona State University and initially funded through a grant from Science Foundation Arizona is trying to answer that question by analyzing how best to use solar and other sustainable energy throughout the state.

A top official from the U.S. Department of Energy, Undersecretary Kristina Johnson, recently visited the project, and other VIPs are coming soon. The hope is that the Az SMART project will provide an example for other states to follow in President Obama’s plan to reduce emissions, reduce foreign oil dependence and create jobs in a clean technology economy. The project includes tools to benefit homeowners, businesses and the leaders who need to make informed decisions about which power-generation methods to use and where to locate new facilities, such as solar fields.

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