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Sustainability News

Sustainability for Arizona: The Issue of Our Age

November 27, 2007

Morrison Institute and the Global Institute of Sustainability

The 6th edition of Morrison Institute's Arizona Policy Choices series, Sustainability for Arizona describes sustainability as a defining issue and organizing principle for the 21st century. Produced in partnership with Arizona State University's Global Institute of Sustainability, the report provides real-life examples and policy choices for the state. It includes the advice and insights of more than 25 policy leaders and thinkers from the public and private sectors, including ASU President Michael Crow.

> Read the report

Outdoor Water Use Strains Resources

September 1, 2007

by Patricia Gober for the Arizona Republic

Photo of Patricia Gober, Professor at Arizona State University and Director of Decision Center for a Desert CityWater is the key resource for growth in a desert city like Phoenix. The Valley is blessed with a diverse portfolio of water sources, including the upland watersheds of the Salt and Verde rivers, the Colorado River Basin and, when surface waters are in short supply, a vast network of underground aquifers.

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Being Smart About Being Green

August 27, 2007

By Philip White

Arizona Republic: Environment

Photo of Philip White, Assistant Professor, Arizona State University Evidence that we each need to be more environmentally responsible surrounds us. Global warming is no longer just “a theory,” and the rate of species extinction increases precipitously as the growing human population expands its pressure on the Earth's resources.

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ASU's Global Institute of Sustainability: Guiding Arizona's Long-Term Future

June 9, 2007

by Jonathan Fink for the Arizona Republic

Photo of Jonathan Fink, Julie Ann Wrigley Director of the Global Institute of Sustainability and University Sustainability Officer at Arizona State UniversityArizona is a state built on optimism – a welcoming land of dazzling landscapes, abundant sunshine, and seemingly limitless economic opportunity.

But lately there is a growing unease among our citizens, concern that the bounty that drew us here might be running out. The decade-long drought might turn into a 1930s-style Dust Bowl. The choking “brown cloud” of air pollution might never lift. Night-time temperatures might pass the century mark and keep on rising. Freeway construction might never relieve the growing load of traffic.

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