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Past Wrigley Lecture Series

2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005

Upcoming Wrigley Lecture Series

Funded through the generous support of Julie Ann Wrigley, the Wrigley Lecture Series brings internationally known thinkers and problem-solvers to ASU to engage directly with students and the larger sustainability community.Wrigley Lecture Series

Ray Mabus

  • Secretary of the Navy

Ray Mabus is the 75th US Secretary of the Navy and leads America's Navy and Marine Corps. He is responsible for conducting the affairs of the Department of the Navy, including recruiting, organizing, equipping, training and mobilizing. Additionally, he oversees construction and repair of naval ships, aircraft, and facilities, and formulates and implements policies and programs consistent with the national security policies established by the President and the Secretary of Defense.

In this talk, Secretary Mabus will discuss the importance of the global presence of the Navy and Marine Corps in maintaining and promoting energy security.

Free transportation will be available from campus. The first bus will leave at 8:45 a.m. from the 1st United Methodist Church Parking lot located to the west of Wrigley Hall. Map

Thursday, April 24, 2014
9:00 a.m. reception
10:00-11:30 a.m. lecture
Tempe Center for the Arts, Lakeside Room
700 W Rio Salado Pkwy
Tempe, AZ 85281
(light breakfast provided)


RSVP »

Past Wrigley Lecture Series

Wrigley Lecture Series

Julian Agyeman



Julian Agyeman

Join Mayor Greg Stanton as he welcomes Julian Agyeman to Phoenix.

Julian Agyeman is an environmental social scientist whose expertise and research interests are in the complex and embedded relations between humans and the environment (whether mediated by governmental institutions or social movements) and the effects of these on public policy, planning processes, and outcomes, particularly related to notions of justice and equity. Agyeman has over 150 publications; his recent books include: Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability and Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice.

In this Wrigley talk, Agyeman will first outline the concept of “just sustainabilities." He will argue that integrating social needs and welfare offers us a more “just,” rounded, and equity-focused definition of sustainability, while not negating the very real environmental threats we face. He will then look at real-world examples of just sustainabilities, focusing on ideas about "fair shares" resource distribution; planning for intercultural cities; achieving well-being and happiness; the potential in the new sharing economy, and, finally, the concept of “spatial justice.”

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
7:30 - 9:00 p.m.
doors open and dessert reception at 7:00 p.m. featuring local food trucks: Mamma Toledo's Pie, Frosted Frenzy Cupcakes, and Paletas Betty Popsicles
event begins at 7:30 p.m.
Civic Space Park
424 N. Central Ave. Downtown Phoenix
(between 1st and Central Avenues, just north of Van Buren Street/Central Station)

Wrigley Lecture Series

Amory Lovins



Amory Lovins

  • Cofounder and Chief Scientist, Rocky Mountain Institute

The world is on the road toward a clean-energy system based on increasingly cost-competitive technologies. These new winners include energy efficiency, solar, wind, and flexible demand through a smart grid, integrated with geothermal, biomass, and hydro.

Join us as Amory Lovins describes how we can remove the barriers to renewable energy—to save our climate, protect our economy, and restore our energy security. Then, after the talk, Carbon Nation director and School of Sustainability Professor of Practice Peter Byck will engage Lovins and the audience in a full-throttled discussion.

Amory Lovins has been active at the nexus of energy, resources, economy, environment, development, and security in more than 50 countries for over 40 years. He is widely considered among the world’s leading authorities on energy—especially its efficient use and sustainable supply—and a fertile innovator in integrative design and in superefficient buildings, factories, and vehicles. Lovins is the chief scientist for Rocky Mountain Institute, an independent, entrepreneurial, nonprofit think-and-do tank™ that “drives the efficient and restorative use of resources, creating a world thriving, verdant, and secure, for all, for ever.” Lovins was named by Time magazine as one of the world's 100 most influential people. He has authored 31 books, including Reinventing Fire, Winning the Oil Endgame, and Natural Capitalism.

Note: Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; program begins 7:00 p.m. sharp.

This event is at maximum capacity. Please arrive before 6:45 p.m. to ensure a seat. We will release reserved seats at 6:55 p.m. and the event will start promptly at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday, March 6, 2014
Doors open 6:30 p.m.
Lecture, 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Tempe Center for the Arts
700 W Rio Salado Pkwy
Tempe, AZ 85281
(dessert reception to follow)

Wrigley Lecture Series

Gary Hirshberg



Gary Hirshberg

  • Chairman of the board and former CEO, Stonyfield Farm

In 1983, Gary Hirshberg and his business partner set out with seven cows at their organic farming school to prove that sustainability can be highly profitable. Thirty years later, his company, Stonyfield Farm, at $350M in annual sales, is the world's largest organic yogurt company, supporting thousands of family farmers on hundreds of thousands of highly productive chemical-free acres. Now Stonyfield's chairman, the former "CE-Yo" serves on many corporate boards and advises business and government leaders on sustainable solutions that enhance profitability for all stakeholders.

In this talk, Hirshberg will share his experiences and examples about how we can all think differently about harmonizing positive business and environmental outcomes. He will also describe his work as chairman and co-founder of the Just Label It campaign, which advocates for mandatory national labeling of genetically engineered foods, and explains how this campaign fits into a larger sustainability context.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014
7:00 - 8:45 p.m.
Tempe Center for the Arts
700 W. Rio Salado Parkway
Tempe, AZ 85281
(dessert reception to follow)

Wrigley Lecture Series

Dale Whittington



Dale Whittington

  • Professor of Environmental Sciences & Engineering and City & Regional Planning
  • University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the Manchester Business School (UK)

Whittington is the author of over 100 publications related to economic and public-policy issues of water-resources management in developing countries. He has been a member of the World Bank’s Blue Ribbon Panel on the Nile River, the Ganges Basin Strategic Assessment Team, the Technical Committee of the Global Water Partnership, and has consulted with the Asian Development Bank, US-AID, the Hopi Indian Tribe, and many other organizations.

Most water utilities in developing countries charge prices far below the real costs of service and have no cash reserves to expand services, support growth, or adapt to climate change. In this talk, Whittington reviews 100,000 years of investment and innovation along water-development paths to explain this predicament. He identifies three ancient behavioral responses that complicate our ability to improve water and sanitation services and are an obstacle to sustainable economic growth.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, Great Hall
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Naomi Oreskes



Naomi Oreskes

  • Science Historian and Author
  • Professor, University of California, San Diego Department of History
  • Adjunct Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Naomi Oreskes has a long-standing interest in understanding the establishment of scientific consensus and the role and character of scientific dissent. For the past decade, she has primarily been interested in the problem of human-caused climate change. She has won numerous prizes, including the 2011 Climate Change Communicator of the Year.

Oreskes and co-author Erik Conway argue in their 2010 book, Merchants of Doubt, that some scientists with extensive political connections have run campaigns for over four decades denying well-established scientific knowledge about tobacco, acid rain, DDT, and, most importantly, climate change.

Monday, April 22, 2013
4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
Old Main, Carson Ballroom
Arizona State University, Tempe campus
(reception to follow)


Video


Who is Responsible for Climate Change?

Wrigley Lecture Series

Sir Crispin Tickell



Sir Crispin Tickell

  • Advisory Council Member, Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford

When we know something of our past, we think we know the present. Some may see the future as a continuation of past and present, but according to Sir Crispin Tickell, this outlook is ineffective. In this visionary talk, Sir Crispin will urge us to confront the issues of our day: the multiplication of our species in all its aspects; the economics of health and wealth; the future source of food and energy; adaptation to climate change; and the shortcomings of conventional wisdom. Will the Anthropocene epoch represent no more than a relatively short episode in the story of life on Earth?

A pioneer in linking environmental and climatic change to the realms of politics and business, Sir Crispin Tickell is a former diplomat, warden of Green College Oxford, Chancellor of the University of Kent, and serves as an adviser to ASU's President Michael M. Crow. He is the author of many papers and books, including "Climate Change and World Affairs" and "Mary Anning of Lyme Regis."

Welcoming remarks by:
ASU's President Michael M. Crow
Global Institute of Sustainability's new director, Gary Dirks

Thursday, April 11, 2013
6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Tempe Center for the Arts - Lakeside Room
700 W. Rio Salado Parkway
Tempe, AZ 85281
(reception to follow)


Video


The Human Future

Wrigley Lecture Series

Sunita Narain



Sunita Narain

  • Director General, The Centre for Science and Environment
  • Director, The Society for Environmental Communications
  • Publisher, Down to Earth magazine

In this age of extreme weather events and crippling water shortages it is time for the birth of a new environmentalism. Climate change is making the world populations, particularly the poor, more vulnerable. Globally, we are failing to reduce emissions at the scale and pace needed. Countries like India are failing to deal with the challenges of pollution and environmental degradation. It is now time to learn from the environmentalism of the poor how to reinvent growth that is affordable, sustainable, and inclusive.

Sunita Narain is a writer and environmentalist who was named one of the world's 100 Public Intellectuals three times by the U.S. journal, Foreign Policy. She received the World Water Prize for her work on rainwater harvesting and policy influence for community-based water management.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Asian Research and the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013
5:00 - 6:30 p.m.
Lattie F. Coor Hall, Room 170
Arizona State University, Tempe campus
(reception to follow)


Video


Environmentalism of the Poor vs. Environmentalism of the Rich

Wrigley Lecture Series

Enrique Peñalosa



Enrique Peñalosa

  • President
  •    Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
  • Former Mayor
  •    Bogotá, Colombia

An accomplished public official and "new urbanist," Enrique Peñalosa developed a model for urban improvement based on the equal rights of all people to transportation, education, and public spaces. While mayor of Bogotá, his sustainability initiatives gave priority to children and public spaces, building hundreds of sidewalks, bicycle paths, pedestrian streets, greenways, and parks.

Since leaving office, Peñalosa has worked to promote sustainable urbanism in cities around the world, bringing about sustainable transportation solutions.

During this Wrigley lecture, Peñalosa will reflect on his decades of practice and leadership in the area of urban planning and policy and offer lessons for future equitable and sustainable city-regions.

Monday, February 18, 2013
5:30 - 7:00 p.m.
Tempe Center for the Arts - Lakeside Room
700 W. Rio Salado Parkway
Tempe, AZ 85281
(reception to follow)

Reservations are at capacity for this event. Please arrive early to ensure a seat.


Video


Equity, Mobility, and the Quality of Urban Life

Wrigley Lecture Series

Sander van der Leeuw



Sander van der Leeuw

  • Dean, School of Sustainability
  • 2012 United Nations Champion of the Earth

Humans have so deeply impacted our world that the study of the evolution of societies cannot be separated from the study of environmental change. In this talk, van der Leeuw will outline the three phases of human innovation in the processing of matter, energy, and information and the ever-greater environmental actions which led to this point. Van der Leeuw will argue for the need of a societal shift to a focus on sustainability and innovation that includes awareness of consequences.

Sander van der Leeuw is the 2012 United Nations Champion of the Earth for Science and Innovation. His expertise lies in the role of invention, sustainability, and innovation in societies around the world.

Thursday, November 15, 2012
5:00 - 6:30 p.m.
(reception to follow)
Tempe Center for the Arts - Lakeside Room
700 W. Rio Salado Pkwy
Tempe, AZ 85281

Please arrive early, as reservations do not guarantee a seat.


Video


Complex Systems Theory, Sustainability, and Innovation

Wrigley Lecture Series

Captain Wayne Porter, USN



Captain Wayne Porter, USN

  • Chair, Systemic Strategy and Complexity
  • Naval Postgraduate School

Captain Wayne Porter will present the first Wrigley Lecture Series of the 2012-2013 academic year. He will be discussing his piece, "A National Strategic Narrative," co-authored with Colonel Mark Mykleby. The narrative argues for a need of a sustainability context when protecting our nation's prosperity and security. It is now time to move the nation from a Cold War strategy of containment to a strategy of sustainability designed to address our enduring interests in a dynamic environment.

Captain Porter has served operational tours in England, Japan, Italy, the Balkans, and Bahrain. His personal awards include the Ellis Island Medal of Honor, the Defense Superior Service Medal, three Legions of Merit, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Meritorious Service Medal, the NATO Meritorious Service Medal, and the Vice Admiral Rufus B. Taylor Award for Professional Excellence in Intelligence for his work in southern Serbia.

Thursday, October 25, 2012
4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
(reception will follow)
Old Main, Carson Ballroom
Arizona State University, Tempe campus


Video


The Darwinian Moment:
A Narrative for Adaptation

Wrigley Lecture Series

Gernot Wagner



Gernot Wagner

  • Economist, Environmental Defense Fund

Wagner is the author of But Will the Planet Notice? How Smart Economics Can Save the World. In this talk, Gernot Wagner will argue that only economists—not recyclers—can stop global warming.

He serves as an economist at the Environmental Defense Fund, teaches at Columbia University, and he graduated from Harvard and Stanford. He doesn't eat meat, doesn't drive, and knows full well the futility of his personal choices.

This event is co-sponsored by the W. P. Carey School of Business.

March 14, 2012
2:00-3:30 p.m.
(Refreshments will be served)

Memorial Union, Turquoise Room
Parking: Apache Boulevard structure - $2/hr.


Video


Video


But Will The Planet Notice?

Wrigley Lecture Series

William McDonough



William McDonough

  • McDonough Advisors / William McDonough + Partners Architecture and
  • Community Design / McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry

William McDonough has been a leader in sustainable development since the 1970s. Trained as an architect, McDonough's interests and influence range widely, and he works at scales from the global to the molecular. He has written and lectured extensively on his design philosophy and practice; 20 years ago, he wrote The Hannover Principles: Design for Sustainability, and 10 years ago, he and Dr. Michael Braungart co-authored Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. Both are considered seminal texts of the sustainability movement.

McDonough served as Dean of the University of Virginia School of Architecture; he is also a Visiting Professor at the same university's Darden School of Business and a Consulting Professor at Stanford University. He is a member of the board of trustees of ASU's Global Institute of Sustainability.

In this Wrigley Lecture, McDonough will discuss his co-authored book, Cradle to Cradle, which offers practical steps for innovating within today's economic environment. Part social history, part green-business primer, part design manual, he argues that an industrial system that “takes, makes, and wastes” can become a creator of goods and services that generate ecological, social, and economic value.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012
7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
(Reception to follow)

Neeb Hall
Arizona State University at the Tempe campus


Video



Video


Cradle-to-Cradle Design, Education, and a Future of Abundance

Wrigley Lecture Series

Robin Morris Collin



Robin Morris Collin

  • Norma J. Paulus Professor of Law,
  • Willamette University College of Law

Sustainability is often described as the three "E"s—ecology, economics, and equity. Modern, technological societies must face the challenges of equity in contemporary life. Environmental justice is an American-based movement challenging disparities in risk-exposure and access to benefits. Environmental justice and sustainability reflect a deep division along race and class lines. This talk will explore the need for collaboration and repurposing in both movements.

Morris Collin, who has taught law since 1984, came to Willamette after a distinguished 10-year career as a tenured faculty member of the University of Oregon School of Law. One of her latest publications is "Restoration and Redemption" in Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril, a collection of testimonies by visionaries including Michael M. Crow, the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, and Barack Obama.

Thursday, November 17, 2011
4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
(reception to follow)

Old Main, Carson Ballroom
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus


Video


Video


Sustainability and Environmental Justice

Wrigley Lecture Series

Frank Sesno

  • Director, School of Media and Public Affairs,
  • The George Washington University
  • Host and Creator, Planet Forward

Join us as Professor Sesno explores the deepening skepticism around climate science and the new roles that universities, media, and the concerned public must play if we are to move from stalemate to solutions.

A former anchor, White House correspondent, and interview host with CNN, Sesno is also a nationally renowned moderator, engaging some of the world's leading personalities, from five American presidents, to Yasser Arafat, Margret Thatcher, and Walter Cronkite. He is also the host and creator of Planet Forward, an innovative web-television initiative as seen on PBS.

Thursday, September 22, 2011
4:30 - 6:00 p.m.
Reception to Follow at Engrained Café

Memorial Union, Turquoise Room
Arizona State University, Tempe campus
Parking: Apache Boulevard Structure ($2/hr)


Video



Video


Science is Not Enough

Wrigley Lecture Series

William Cronon



William Cronon

  • President, American Historical Association
  • Frederick Jackson Turner and Vilas Research Professor of History, Geography, and Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

William Cronon's work seeks to understand the history of human interactions with the natural world: how we depend on the ecosystems around us to sustain our material lives, how we modify the landscapes in which we live and work, and how our ideas of nature shape our relationships with the world around us. He is the author of several prize-winning books, including: Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England; Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; and the soon-to-be published Saving Nature in Time: The Environmental Past and the Human Future.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
4:15 - 5:45 p.m.
(reception to follow)

Wrigley Hall, Room 101

Wrigley Lecture Series

Andrew C. Revkin

  • Author, The New York Times Dot Earth Blog
  • Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, Pace University

Braden R. Allenby

  • Distinguished Sustainability Scientist, Global Institute of Sustainability
  • Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, ASU

How do very complex systems—natural, human, built, technological—interact under rapidly changing conditions? Join us for a free-wheeling conversation between author Andy Revkin and ASU Sustainability Scientist Brad Allenby, as they discuss how we can build social, economic, and environmental sustainability in a highly unpredictable, contingent world.

One of America’s most honored science writers, Revkin has been reporting in print and on Dot Earth for The New York Times since 1995. He has spent a quarter century writing on the environment, covering subjects ranging from Hurricane Katrina and the Asian tsunami to the assault on the Amazon and the troubled relationship of climate science and politics. In his blog, Dot Earth, Revkin examines efforts to balance human affairs with the planet’s limits.

Wednesday, February 2, 2011
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
(Coffee & pastries will be served)

Old Main, Carson Ballroom, 2nd floor
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Video


Video


Dot Earth: 9 Billion + 1 Planet

Wrigley Lecture Series

Peter H. Raven

  • President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Garden
  • George Engelmann Professor of Botany Emeritus, Washington University in St. Louis

What is the future of biodiversity and what steps can we take to preserve it? Leading botanist and conservationist Peter Raven served as president of the Missouri Botanical Garden and Professor of Botany at Washington University, St. Louis, for 39 years. Analyzing estimates of extinction rates and the major factors leading to extinction, he will discuss a world faced with many choices of central importance for our future, emphasizing the role of global climate change.

Tuesday, December 7, 2010
4:30 - 5:45 p.m.
(reception to follow)

Coor Hall, Room 170
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Van Jones

  • Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
  • Distinguished Visiting Fellow, Princeton University

Our country is struggling in the face of an economic recession and ecological crisis. We need nine million new jobs in the U.S., and they must be jobs that can support families and do no harm to the environment. America needs her best minds generating smart and innovative ideas to create more jobs.

Named by Time as one of the "100 Most Influential People in the World" in 2009, Van Jones is a globally recognized pioneer in human rights and the clean energy economy. He co-founded three successful nonprofit organizations, is the best-selling author of The Green-Collar Economy, and served as the green jobs advisor in the Obama White House in 2009.

Reserved seating available for our handicapped guests or those needing assistance. Contact: laurenkuby@asu.edu.

Thursday, November 4, 2010
5:00 - 6:30 p.m.

Student Services Lawn and Amphitheater
Arizona State University at the Tempe campus
(Parking at Apache Structure)

Wrigley Lecture Series

Cynthia Rosenzweig



Cynthia Rosenzweig

  • Senior Scientist, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies
  • Fellow, American Society of Agronomy
  • Leader, Metro East Coast Climate Assessment

As head of the Climate Impacts Group at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Rosenzweig has organized and led large-scale interdisciplinary regional, national, and international studies of climate change impacts and adaptation. She is a coordinating lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II Fourth Assessment Report, Observed Changes Chapter; the IPCC assesses the scientific, technical, and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change.

Rosenzweig co-chairs the New York City Panel on Climate Change—a body of experts convened by the Mayor to advise the city on adaptation for its critical infrastructure. Her research involves the development of interdisciplinary methods to assess the potential impacts of and adaptations to global environmental change.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Old Main, Carson Ballroom
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Frances Westley



Frances Westley

  • J. W. McConnell Chair, Social Innovation, University of Waterloo

Dr. Frances Westley joined the University of Waterloo in July of 2007 as Chair of Social Innovation Generation, a national initiative designed to build capacity for social innovation in Canada. She is published widely in the areas of building resilience of socioecological systems, knowledge generation, managing uncertainty and change, and visionary leadership. Her books include Experiments in Consilience,which focused on the dynamics of collaboration in managing ecological and conservation challenges, and Getting to Maybe, which addresses the interrelationship of individual and system dynamics in social innovation and transformation.

Monday, February 8, 2010
(reception to follow)

Old Main, Carson Ballroom
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Jason Clay



Jason Clay

  • Senior Vice President Market Transformations, World Wildlife Fund

How do we live on a finite planet and yet feed and clothe nine billion people by 2050? Dr. Jason Clay will explore the World Wildlife Fund's (WWF's) thinking about this issue as well as his work in supply-chain management with individual companies and entire sectors. In his role at the WWF, Clay works to transform leading private-sector companies and entire industries by developing credible global standards and measurably improving performance against them.

The author of over 250 articles and 15 books, Clay studied at Harvard and the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. in anthropology and international agriculture from Cornell in 1979.

Over the course of his career, he has run a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale, worked in the USDA, and spent over 25 years working with human-rights and environmental organizations. In 1988, Clay invented Rainforest Marketing, one of the first fair-trade ecolabels in the US.

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Old Main, Carson Ballroom
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

John Hofmeister



John Hofmeister

  • Founder and CEO, Citizens for Affordable Energy
  • Retired President, Shell Oil

John Hofmeister is a business leader who has participated in the inner workings of multiple industries for over 35 years. He retired as president of Shell Oil Company in 2008 to found and head the nationwide nonprofit group, Citizens for Affordable Energy. This public policy education firm promotes sound energy security solutions for the nation, including a range of affordable energy supplies, efficiency improvements, essential infrastructure, sustainable environmental policies, and public education on energy issues. His global corporate experiences across a wide range of both energy-consuming and energy-producing companies have led him to consider environmental security in the 21st century differently from mainstream practice.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
(reception to follow)

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 101

Wrigley Lecture Series

Craig Cogut



Craig Cogut

  • Founder and Co-Managing Partner, Pegasus Capital Advisors
  • Co-founder, Pegasus Sustainable Century MB, L.P.

Craig Cogut has over 27 years of experience in private equity investing, financial restructuring, and legal advisory service. In 1995, he founded Pegasus Capital Advisors, a private equity-fund manager that provides creative capital and business solutions to middle-market companies across a variety of industries, with emphasis on businesses adopting sustainable business practices. In 2008, he was honored by the New York League of Conservation Voters for his efforts in support of sustainable businesses.

Monday, November 9, 2009
(reception to follow)

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 101

Wrigley Lecture Series

Jared Blumenfeld



Jared Blumenfeld

  • Director, Department of the Environment, City of San Francisco

San Francisco has become one of the most innovative cities in the world in implementing new comprehensive approaches to urban sustainability. From its groundbreaking zero waste strategies such as the residential compost and green waste recycling program, to its energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, the City has been a leader in designing and implementing programs that work. The City's newest project, EcoMap, will allow citizens to track their progress toward sustainability goals on a zip code by zip code basis. Jared Blumenfeld, Director of San Francisco's Environment Department, will talk about the successes and challenges the City has experienced in implementing urban sustainability programs and the many partnerships the City has developed that help it to reach its sustainability goals.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 101

Wrigley Lecture Series

Jim Hall

  • Civil and Environmental Engineer, Newcastle University

Through the Tyndall Centre Cities Research Programme, researchers from seven universities and high profile stakeholders have developed an Urban Integrated Assessment Facility (UIAF). This city-scale assessment tool simulates the effects of long term changes in urban areas and can be used to test strategies for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change. In this talk, Tyndall Centre Deputy Director Jim Hall explains the various components of the UIAF and how they have been integrated to answer questions of policy relevance to stakeholders in London.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 481

Wrigley Lecture Series

Andrew J. Hoffman



Andrew J. Hoffman

  • Holcim (US) Professor, Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan
  • Associate Director, Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise

In this talk, Professor Hoffman will discuss the business implications of climate change: why and how companies should be paying attention to the issue. In a nutshell, climate change should be regarded as a market shift, one that will create winners and losers. In fact, business executives can be completely agnostic on the science of the issue and still see it as one of business concern. Professor Hoffman will present the results of several studies that look into the strategies companies are using to address this issue and attempt to integrate it into their business strategy.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 101

Wrigley Lecture Series

Mitch Thomashow



Mitch Thomashow

  • President, Unity College

It is crucial that in uncertain economic times, we reiterate our commitment to sustainable approaches to all aspects of our lives. Broadly conceived, a sustainable culture for a college or university involves infrastructure, community, and learning. The infrastructure challenge involves (1) energy, (2) food, and (3) materials. The community challenge involves (4) governance, (5) investment, and (6) wellness. The learning challenge embodies (7) curriculum, (8) aesthetics, and (9) interpretation. The purpose of these guidelines is to open a discussion regarding the whole system of a sustainable culture.

Friday, March 6, 2009

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 481

Wrigley Lecture Series

Cindy Thomashow



Cindy Thomashow

  • Executive Director, Center for Environmental Education, Unity College

The Unity House is the Presidential Residence at Unity College. It was built as part of the commitment by the College to invest in the future they are trying to educate toward. Mitch and Cindy Thomashow were eager to build a carbon-neutral, LEED platinum home, and even more eager to live in one. This project was the realization of personal philosophy and vision. The 1,900-square-foot house has solar panels on its roof and is designed for a net-zero lifestyle—sometimes it draws power from the electric grid, but what it draws is balanced by power it contributes to the grid at other times.

Friday, March 6, 2009

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 481

Wrigley Lecture Series

Janine Benyus



Janine Benyus

  • Author and President, Biomimicry Institute

Biomimicry is a design discipline that seeks sustainable solutions by emulating nature's time-tested ideas. The goal is to create products, processes, companies and policies that are well adapted to life on earth over the long haul. Biomimics around the world are learning to adhere like a gecko, cool buildings like a termite, make fiber optics like a sea sponge, repel microbes (without antibiotics) like a kelp, and run a business like a redwood forest. In the process, they're creating new ways of living. Janine Benyus, author of the paradigmshifting Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature, will discuss how bio-inspired innovation could solve "grand challenges" while funding the conservation of life's genius.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Memorial Union, Arizona Room
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Margaret A. Palmer



Margaret A. Palmer

  • Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
  • Director, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Rivers and streams are increasingly stressed by human activity, which tends to homogenize flows, simplify habitats, and reduce diversity. As recognition of these impacts has increased, there has been a parallel increase in restoring streams, helping them to recover and be more resilient in the face of future stressors. Margaret Palmer explores the relationship between the science of restoration ecology and the practice of ecological restoration.

Friday, January 23, 2009

Life Sciences E-Wing Tower (LSE), Room 104

Wrigley Lecture Series

Helen Ingram



Helen Ingram

  • Professor of Planning, Policy & Design and the Drew, Chace and Erin Warmington Chair, School of Social Ecology
  • Professor of Political Science, School of Social Sciences
  • University of California, Irvine

Helen Ingram is a Research Fellow at the Southwest Center at the University of Arizona and a Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Irvine. Author of 13 books and over 100 peer reviewed articles and book chapters, Professor Ingram has made scholarly contributions to water resources policy, environmental policy, science and public policy as well as public policy theory. She holds a B.A. in government from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. in public law and government from Columbia University.

Thursday, December 4, 2008

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 101
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Daniel Bodansky



Daniel Bodansky

  • Associate Dean for Faculty Development
  • Emily and Ernset Woodruff Chair in International Law
  • School of Law, University of Georgia

In preparation for the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference, our next President will need to have the building blocks of a US climate change foreign policy in place shortly after inauguration. Daniel Bodansky's talk proposes 10 central foreign policy precepts that address the need for domestic action and buy-in, broad international participation, a flexible architecture, and a multifaceted strategy pursuing progress in a variety of forums. These precepts do not answer every question of climate change policy—many difficult issues remain. But they represent a starting point for developing a successful, bipartisan international climate policy.

Thursday, November 13, 2008

College of Law, Armstrong Hall (Great Hall)
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Bron Taylor



Bron Taylor

  • Professor, Department of Religion, University of Florida

The quest for environmental sustainability depends on accurate diagnoses and fitting prescriptions. But there is no consensus as to the roots of environmental problems or how to respond. Some claim the problems and solutions are largely technological, others say they are largely cultural, and the contending parties rarely meet. This presentation examines the diagnoses and prescriptions typically offered while building an argument that we cannot hope to address our environmental predicaments without taboo-free, interdisciplinary inquiry and instruction, and that we have a long way to go in this regard.

Thursday, November 6, 2008

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 481
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Alan Weisman



Alan Weisman

  • Author

What might happen to the Earth if humans vanished? How would the rest of nature respond if it were suddenly relieved of the relentless pressures we heap on it? How soon would, or could, the climate return to where it was before we fired up all our engines? Could nature ever obliterate all our traces? The World Without Us, Alan Weisman's phenomenal New York Times bestseller, shows us humanity's true impact on the environment in a wholly original way, and challenges each of us to re-imagine our planet—and our place within it.

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Murdock Hall, Room 101
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Karen Polenske



Karen Polenske

  • Professor of Regional Political Economy and Planning, Department of Urban Studies and Planning
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology

China is now the largest producer of coal, coke, and steel in the world. Polenske will trace the supply chains for these important commodities and examine factors that are affecting their prices and use. In addition, she will examine the causes of the recent climb in energy intensity (energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product) in China, which declined by a significant 67% from 1978 to 2000.

Friday, October 24, 2008

College of Design North (CDN), Room 60
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Jay Hakes

  • Director, Jimmy Carter Presidential Library

Energy debates in Washington are disquieting to the careful observer. Economic myths replace science as the basis of decision making. The right believes that governmental controls disrupt energy markets while the left warns that special interests are aiming to thwart the national interest. Neither simplification stands up to economic analysis, baffling the average citizen. Yet we are all searching for solutions that lead us towards energy independence.

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Global Institute of Sustainability, Room 481
Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Peter Singer



Peter Singer

  • Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics, Princeton University
  • Laureate Professor, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, University of Melbourne

Singer specializes in practical ethics, approaching ethical issues mostly from a preference utilitarian perspective. Dr. Singer supports and is actively involved in several humanitarian organizations worldwide, including Oxfam, an organization that works directly with local grass roots organizations in developing countries, and supervises the way its money is used to prevent corruption and waste. He is also the President of Animals Rights International and Chair in the Board of Directors of The Great Ape Project.

Singer has been called "the world's most influential living philosopher," by The New Yorker and Time Magazine listed him in "The Time 100," their annual listing of the world's 100 most influential people.

Monday, April 28, 2008

Evelyn Smith Music Theatre
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Tim Flannery



Tim Flannery

  • Professor, MacQuarie University

Drawing on the ideas from his groundbreaking new book, Tim Flannery presents a straightforward and powerful exploration of the connection between climate change, global warming, and human activity. He has a gift for making complex science understandable for a lay audience, through a deft use of imagery, analogy and common sense. But Flannery does not just tell his audience what is happening to our planet. He very clearly lays out a game plan for halting current warming trends and beginning the long, but entirely achievable project of reversing the damage we have done. His goal is to mobilize his listener—both personally and politically—to recognize that we are all "weather makers" and that the only choice, both logically and ethically, is to begin to address this problem before it's too late.

Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Neeb Hall
Arizona State University, Tempe campus

Wrigley Lecture Series

Jeff Biggers



Jeff Biggers

  • Writer, educator, radio correspondent, and community organizer across the United States, Europe, India and Mexico

Jeff Biggers will discuss Mitraniketan, a legendary village revitalization project in Kerala that turned one of the most deforested, overpopulated, and depressed villages in India into a model of sustainable living and ecological restoration, following the visionary ideas of adivasi forest communities and traditions of Gandhi, Tagore, the Danish folk school, and TVA chair and Antioch President Arthur Morgan.

Jeff Biggers work has taken him acrosss the US, Europe, India, and Mexico. His award-winning stories have appeared on NPR, PRI, and in scores of travel, literary and music magazines, and national and foreign newspapers. He is the author of In the Sierra Madre and The United States of Appalachia.

Thursday, February 21, 2008

Global Institute of Sustainability
Tempe Center, Room 158

Wrigley Lecture Series

Timothy P. Duane



Timothy P. Duane

  • Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning and Landscape Architecture and Planning
  • University of California at Berkeley

The electric utility industry has gone through enormous changes in recent decades, moving from structure dominated by treatment as a state-regulated "natural monopoly" from the 1920s to the 1990s in the United States to a partially deregulated industry since the late 1990s. The shift from the Natural Monopoly Era to the Deregulation Era left a lasting mark on the electric utility regulatory structure. But an equally important shift has been occurring over the past five years in another area of regulatory policy: the climate change policy debate has shifted from "if" we should limit greenhouse gas emissions to "when" and "how" we will limit these emissions.

This presentation explores the implications of the Climate Change Era for electricity regulation, industry structure, generation technology choice, and environmental regulation. In short, it examines how the Greening of the Grid can be achieved through proper incentives and regulation.

Monday, February 4, 2008

College of Design North, Room 60
Arizona State University, Tempe campus



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